espouse+a+cause

  • 1espouse the cause of — index justify, maintain (sustain) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2Espouse — Es*pouse , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Espoused}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Espousing}.] [OF. espouser, esposer, F. [ e]pouser, L. sponsare to betroth, espouse, fr. sponsus betrothed, p. p. of spondere to promise solemnly or sacredly. Cf. {Spouse}.] 1. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3espouse — es|pouse [ıˈspauz] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: espouser, from Latin sponsus; SPOUSE] formal to support an idea, belief etc, especially a political one espouse a cause/policy etc ▪ He espoused a variety of scientific, social and… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 4espouse — To engage to marry; to give or bestow in marriage; to engage in the defense of another; as, to espouse his cause …

    Ballentine's law dictionary

  • 5espouse — mid 15c., to take as spouse, marry, from O.Fr. espouser marry, take in marriage, join in marriage (11c., Mod.Fr. épouser), from L. sponsare, pp. of spondere (see ESPOUSAL (Cf. espousal)). Extended sense of adopt, embrace a cause, party, etc., is… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6espouse — ► VERB ▪ adopt or support (a cause, belief, or way of life). ORIGIN Old French espouser, from Latin sponsus betrothed …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7espouse — [e spouz′, ispouz′] vt. espoused, espousing [ME espousen < OFr espouser < LL sponsare < L sponsus: see SPOUSE] 1. to take as a spouse, esp. as a wife; marry 2. to give in marriage 3. to take up, support, or advocate (some cause, idea,… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8cause — I n. movement objective 1) to advance, champion, fight for, promote; serve a cause 2) to espouse, plead a cause 3) to take up a cause 4) a common; good, just, worthwhile, worthy cause (to make common cause with smb.) 5) a lost cause reason 6) to… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 9espouse — [[t]ɪspa͟ʊz[/t]] espouses, espousing, espoused VERB If you espouse a particular policy, cause, or belief, you become very interested in it and give your support to it. [FORMAL] [V n] She ran away with him to Mexico and espoused the revolutionary… …

    English dictionary

  • 10cause */*/*/ — I UK [kɔːz] / US [kɔz] noun Word forms cause : singular cause plural causes 1) [countable] an event, thing, or person that makes something happen The major cause of these accidents is drivers going too fast. an essay on the causes of the First… …

    English dictionary

  • 11espouse — espouser, n. /i spowz , i spows /, v.t., espoused, espousing. 1. to make one s own; adopt or embrace, as a cause. 2. to marry. 3. to give (a woman) in marriage. [1425 75; late ME < MF espouser < L sponsare to betroth, espouse] Syn. 1. support,&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 12espouse — [15] Etymologically, to espouse something is the same as to sponsor it. Both words go back ultimately to Latin spondēre ‘promise solemnly’. From it developed late Latin spōnsāre, which produced Old French espouser, source of the English verb. It&#8230; …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 13espouse — /əsˈpaʊz / (say uhs powz), /ɛs / (say es ) verb (t) (espoused, espousing) 1. to make one s own, adopt, or embrace, as a cause: *the Al Ma unah cult, which espouses self defence and Jihad, or Holy War –aap news, 2000. 2. to take in marriage; marry …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 14espouse — [15] Etymologically, to espouse something is the same as to sponsor it. Both words go back ultimately to Latin spondēre ‘promise solemnly’. From it developed late Latin spōnsāre, which produced Old French espouser, source of the English verb. It&#8230; …

    Word origins

  • 15espouse — transitive verb (espoused; espousing) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French espuser, from Late Latin sponsare to betroth, from Latin sponsus betrothed more at spouse Date: 15th century 1. marry 2. to take up and support as a cause ; become …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16espouse — verb /ɛsˈspaʊz/ a) To become/get married to. Although Dowty’s proposal is attractive from the point of view of the alternative argument linking theory that I am espousing, since it eschews the use of thematic roles and thematic role hierarchies,&#8230; …

    Wiktionary

  • 17espouse — es·pouse || ɪ spaÊŠz v. marry; champion a cause, support an idea or principle …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 18espouse — [ɪ spaʊz, ɛ ] verb 1》 adopt or support (a cause, belief, or way of life). 2》 archaic marry.     ↘(be espoused to) be engaged to. Derivatives espouser noun Origin ME: from OFr. espouser, from L. sponsare, from sponsus betrothed , past pa …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 19espouse — es•pouse [[t]ɪˈspaʊz, ɪˈspaʊs[/t]] v. t. poused, pous•ing 1) to adopt or embrace, as a cause 2) to marry 3) to give (a woman) in marriage • Etymology: 1425–75; &LT; MF espouser &LT; L spōnsāre to betroth es•pous′er, n …

    From formal English to slang

  • 20espouse — v.tr. 1 adopt or support (a cause, doctrine, etc.). 2 archaic a (usu. of a man) marry. b (usu. foll. by to) give (a woman) in marriage. Derivatives: espouser n. Etymology: ME f. OF espouser f. L sponsare f. sponsus past part. of spondere betroth …

    Useful english dictionary