eject

  • 1 eject — vb Eject, expel, oust, evict, dismiss mean to force or thrust something or someone out. Eject, although it is the comprehensive term of this group and is often interchangeable with any of the others, carries the strongest implication of throwing… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 Eject — E*ject , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Ejected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Ejecting}.] [L. ejectus, p. p. of ejicere; e out + jacere to throw. See {Jet} a shooting forth.] 1. To expel; to dismiss; to cast forth; to thrust or drive out; to discharge; as, to eject a …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 eject — /i jekt/ vt: dispossess Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. eject …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 eject — [ē jekt′, ijekt] vt. [< L ejectus, pp. of ejicere, to throw out < e , out (see EX 1) + jacere, to throw (see JET1)] 1. to throw out; cast out; expel; emit; discharge [the chimney ejects smoke] 2. to drive out; evict [to eject a heckler] …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 Eject — E ject, n. [See {Eject}, v. t.] (Philos.) An object that is a conscious or living object, and hence not a direct object, but an inferred object or act of a subject, not myself; a term invented by W. K. Clifford. [Webster 1913 Suppl.] || …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 eject — eject·ment; eject; …

    English syllables

  • 7 eject — i jekt vt to force out or expel from within <blood ejected from the heart (S. F. Mason)> ejec·tion jek shən n …

    Medical dictionary

  • 8 eject — mid 15c., from L. eiectus thrown out, pp. of eicere throw out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + icere, comb. form of iacere to throw (see JET (Cf. jet) (v.)). Related: Ejected; ejecting …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 eject — (izg. idžèkt) m DEFINICIJA tehn. tipka za izbacivanje medija na audio i video uređajima (ili u računalnim programima) ETIMOLOGIJA engl. ← lat., v. ejektirati …

    Hrvatski jezični portal

  • 10 eject — [v] throw or be thrown out banish, bounce*, bump, cast out, debar, disbar, discharge, disgorge, dislodge, dismiss, displace, dispossess, ditch, do away with*, drive off, dump*, eighty six*, ejaculate, eliminate, emit, eradicate, eruct, erupt,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 11 eject — ► VERB 1) force or throw out violently or suddenly. 2) (of a pilot) escape from an aircraft by means of an ejection seat. 3) compel (someone) to leave a place. DERIVATIVES ejection noun ejector noun. ORIGIN Latin eicere throw out , from jacere …

    English terms dictionary

  • 12 Eject — Das Eject Symbol Die Auswurftaste oder Eject Taste ist eine Taste an einem Gerät (oder dessen Fernbedienung), mit der ein Speichermedium ausgeworfen wird. Eine Auswurftaste befindet sich typischerweise an Autoradios, Videorekordern, Streamern und …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 13 eject — v. (D; intr., tr.) to eject from (to eject from a disabled plane; they were ejected from the room for disorderly conduct) * * * [ɪ dʒekt] (D; intr., tr.) to eject from (to eject from a disabled plane; they were ejected from the room for dis… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 14 eject — e|ject [ıˈdʒekt] v [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: ejectus, past participle of eicere to throw out ] 1.) [T] to make someone leave a place or building by using force eject sb from sth ▪ The demonstrators were ejected from the hall. 2.) [T] to… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 eject — [[t]ɪʤe̱kt[/t]] ejects, ejecting, ejected 1) VERB If you eject someone from a place, you force them to leave. [V n] Officials used guard dogs to eject the protesters... [V n from n] He was ejected from a restaurant. Derived words: ejection… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 eject — verb 1) the volcano ejected ash Syn: emit, spew out, discharge, give off, send out, belch, vent; expel, release, disgorge, spout, vomit, throw up 2) the pilot had time to eject Syn …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 17 eject — UK [ɪˈdʒekt] / US verb Word forms eject : present tense I/you/we/they eject he/she/it ejects present participle ejecting past tense ejected past participle ejected 1) a) [transitive] formal to make someone leave a place, especially using physical …

    English dictionary

  • 18 eject — transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin ejectus, past participle of eicere, from e + jacere Date: 15th century 1. a. to throw out especially by physical force, authority, or influence < ejected the player from the game > b. to evict …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 eject — verb 1 push/send sth out ADVERB ▪ forcibly ▪ physically ▪ summarily (esp. BrE) ▪ They were summarily ejected by the security guard. PREPOSITION …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 20 eject — verb 1 (T) to make someone leave a place or building by using force: eject sb from: The demonstrators were ejected from the hall. 2 (T) to suddenly send something out: Ants eject formic acid when another insect tries to attack them. 3 (I) to jump …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English