dulness

  • 1 Dulness — is the goddess who presides over Alexander Pope s The Dunciad. She is the daughter of Nox and Chaos, and her mission is to convert all the world to stupidity. Her triumph is part of the translatio stultitia (the inverse of the translatio studii) …

    Wikipedia

  • 2 dulness — Dullness Dull ness, n. The state of being dull; slowness; stupidity; heaviness; drowsiness; bluntness; obtuseness; dimness; want of luster; want of vividness, or of brightness. [Written also {dulness}.] [1913 Webster] And gentle dullness ever… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 dulness — dull ► ADJECTIVE 1) lacking interest or excitement. 2) lacking brightness or sheen. 3) (of the weather) overcast. 4) slow to understand; rather unintelligent. 5) indistinctly felt or heard. ► VERB ▪ make or become dull …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4 dulness — noun see dullness * * * dullˈness or dulˈness noun The state or quality of being dull • • • Main Entry: ↑dull * * * dulness see dullness …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 5 dulness — noun see dull I …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 6 dulness — See dullish. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 7 dulness — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun See dullness …

    English dictionary for students

  • 8 dulness — dul·ness || dÊŒlnɪs n. slow wittedness, stupidity; boredom, tedium; bluntness, quality of not being sharp …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 9 dulness — dul·ness …

    English syllables

  • 10 dullness, dulness — The character of the sound obtained by percussing over a solid part incapable of resonating; usually applied to an area containing less air than those which can resonate. shifting d. a sign of free peritoneal fluid wherein the d. of percussion… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 11 The Dunciad — Alexander Pope The Dunciad /ˈd …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 Augustan poetry — is the poetry that flourished during the reign of Caesar Augustus as Emperor of Rome, most notably including the works of Virgil, Horace, and Ovid. This poetry was more explicitly political than the poetry that had preceded it, and it was… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 John Rich (producer) — John Rich (1692 1761) was an important director and theatre manager in 18th century London. He opened the New Theatre at Lincoln s Inn Fields (1714) and began putting on ever more lavish productions. He introduced pantomime to the English stage… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 John Trumbull (poet) — John Trumbull (April 24, 1750 – May 11, 1831), American poet, was born in what is now Watertown, Connecticut, where his father was a Congregational preacher. At the age of seven he passed his entrance examinations at Yale, but did not enter until …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 English words first attested in Chaucer — Contents 1 Etymology 2 List 2.1 Canterbury Tales General Prologue …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 aridity — n. 1. Dryness, aridness, parchedness, siccity, want of moisture, sterility, barrenness, unfertility. 2. Dryness, want of interest, dulness, pointlessness, jejuneness, unsuggestiveness, barrenness, infecundity, sterility. 3. Dulness, insensibility …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 17 insensibility — n. 1. Torpor, lethargy, dulness, want of sensibility. 2. Apathy, indifference, insusceptibility. 3. Dulness, stupidity. 4. Unconsciousness, suspension of consciousness, loss of sensibility, suspension of feeling …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 18 obtuseness — n. 1. Bluntness. 2. Dulness, stupidity, stolidity, doltishness, obtusion, obtusity. 3. Dulness, obscurity …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 19 Dullness — Dull ness, n. The state of being dull; slowness; stupidity; heaviness; drowsiness; bluntness; obtuseness; dimness; want of luster; want of vividness, or of brightness. [Written also {dulness}.] [1913 Webster] And gentle dullness ever loves a joke …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 dull — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English dul; akin to Old English dol foolish, Old Irish dall blind Date: 13th century 1. mentally slow ; stupid 2. a. slow in perception or sensibility ; insensible < somewhat dull of h …

    New Collegiate Dictionary