distrain

  • 1 distrain — dis·train /di strān/ vb [Anglo French destreindre, literally, to constrict, force, from Old French, from Late Latin distringere to hinder, punish, from Latin, to pull in different directions, distract, from dis apart + stringere to draw tight] vt …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Distrain — Dis*train , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distrained}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distraining}.] [OE. destreinen to force, OF. destreindre to press, oppress, force, fr. L. distringere, districtum, to draw asunder, hinder, molest, LL., to punish severely; di =… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 distrain — dis‧train [dɪˈstreɪn] verb [transitive] LAW to take goods from someone to be sold in order to pay rent that is owed: • Legislation has largely restricted the right to distrain goods found upon the premises but not belonging to the tenant.… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4 Distrain — Dis*train , v. i. To levy a distress. [1913 Webster] Upon whom I can distrain for debt. Camden. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 distrain — [di strān′] vt., vi. [ME distreinen < OFr destreindre < ML distringere, to force by seizure of goods < L, to pull asunder, detain < dis , apart + stringere, to draw tight, stretch: see STRICT] Law to seize and hold (property) as… …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 distrain — verb Etymology: Middle English distreynen, from Anglo French destreindre, from Medieval Latin distringere, from Latin, to draw apart, detain, from dis + stringere to bind tight more at strain Date: 14th century transitive verb 1. to force or… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 distrain — distrainable, adj. distrainee, n. distrainment, n. distrainor, distrainer, n. /di strayn /, Law. v.t. 1. to constrain by seizing and holding goods, etc., in pledge for rent, damages, etc., or in order to …

    Universalium

  • 8 distrain — verb /dɪˈstɹeɪn/ To seize somebodys property in place of, or to force, payment of a debt. But when he heard her answeres loth, he knew / Some secret sorrow did her heart distraine [...]. Syn: distress …

    Wiktionary

  • 9 Distrain — To force a person to do something or act out an obligation under threat of being dispossessed. Cf. Distraint of knighthood; Disseisin, Distress; Distringas …

    Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • 10 distrain — v. a. 742, 752 B …

    Oldest English Words

  • 11 distrain — dis·train || dɪ streɪn v. foreclose on property, take property in payment for debts …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 12 distrain — [dɪ streɪn] verb Law seize (property) in order to obtain payment of rent or other money owed. Derivatives distrainer noun distrainment noun Origin ME: from OFr. destreindre, from L. distringere stretch apart …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 13 distrain — v. a. (Law.) Seize (for debt), take, attach, distress …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 14 distrain — To seize goods as a security for the performance of an obligation, especially the seizure of goods by a landlord because a tenant is in arrears with his rent …

    Big dictionary of business and management

  • 15 distrain — dis·train …

    English syllables

  • 16 distrain — dis•train [[t]dɪˈstreɪn[/t]] v. t. 1) law to seize and hold goods, etc., of (another) in order to obtain satisfaction of a claim for damages, unpaid rent, etc 2) law to levy a distress • Etymology: 1250–1300; ME distreinen < AF, OF destreindre …

    From formal English to slang

  • 17 distrain — /dəsˈtreɪn/ (say duhs trayn) Law –verb (t) 1. to constrain by seizing and holding goods, etc., in pledge for rent, damages, etc., or in order to obtain satisfaction of a claim. 2. to levy a distress upon. –verb (i) 3. to levy a distress. {Middle… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 18 distrain —   vb. Law. seize goods in default of payment.    ♦ distraint, n …

    Dictionary of difficult words

  • 19 distrain — /dɪ streɪn/ verb to seize goods to pay for debts …

    Dictionary of banking and finance

  • 20 distrain — To take as a pledge property of another, and keep it until he performs his obligation or until the property is replevied by the sheriff. Remedy used to secure an appearance in court, payment of rent, performance of services, etc. Also, any… …

    Black's law dictionary


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