distract

  • 1 Distract — Dis*tract , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Distracted}, old p. p. {Distraught}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Distracting}.] 1. To draw apart or away; to divide; to disjoin. [1913 Webster] A city . . . distracted from itself. Fuller. [1913 Webster] 2. To draw (the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Distract — Dis*tract , a. [L. distractus, p. p. of distrahere to draw asunder; dis + trahere to draw. See {Trace}, and cf. {Distraught}.] 1. Separated; drawn asunder. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] 2. Insane; mad. [Obs.] Drayton. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 distract — index bait (harass), confuse (bewilder), disorganize, disorient, disrupt, disturb, divert …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 distract — mid 14c., to draw asunder or apart, to turn aside (literal and figurative), from L. distractus, pp. of distrahere draw in different directions, from dis away (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + trahere to draw (see TRACT (Cf. tract) (1)). Sense of to throw… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 distract — bewilder, nonplus, confound, dumbfound, mystify, perplex, *puzzle Analogous words: *confuse, muddle, addle, fuddle, befuddle: baffle, balk (see FRUSTRATE): agitate, upset, fluster, flurry, perturb, *discompose Antonyms: collect (one s thoughts,… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 distract — [v] divert attention; confuse abstract, addle, agitate, amuse, befuddle, beguile, bewilder, call away, catch flies*, confound, derange, detract, discompose, disconcert, disturb, divert, draw away, engross, entertain, fluster, frenzy, harass, lead …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 distract — ► VERB 1) prevent (someone) from giving their full attention to something. 2) divert (attention) from something. DERIVATIVES distracted adjective distracting adjective. ORIGIN Latin distrahere draw apart …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 distract — [di strakt′] vt. [ME distracten < L distractus, pp. of distrahere, to draw apart < dis , apart + trahere, DRAW] 1. to draw (the mind, attention, etc.) away in another direction; divert 2. to draw in conflicting directions; create conflict… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 distract */ — UK [dɪˈstrækt] / US verb [transitive] Word forms distract : present tense I/you/we/they distract he/she/it distracts present participle distracting past tense distracted past participle distracted to get someone s attention and prevent them from… …

    English dictionary

  • 10 distract — detract, distract Both words are used transitively (with an object) followed by from; but their meanings are different. Detract, which (more than distract) is also used without an object, means ‘to take away (a part of something), to diminish’: • …

    Modern English usage

  • 11 distract — dis|tract [ dı strækt ] verb transitive * to get someone s attention and prevent them from concentrating on something: She was distracted by the sound of running water. distract someone from something: We must let nothing distract us from our… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 12 distract — 01. It was hard to concentrate on my studies because I kept getting [distracted] by the television show my brother was watching. 02. The driver hit another car when he was momentarily [distracted] by a child running into the street. 03. What s… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 13 distract — dis|tract [dıˈstrækt] v [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: distractus, past participle of distrahere to pull apart ] to take someone s attention away from something by making them look at or listen to something else ▪ Try not to distract the… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 distract — verb (T) to make someone who is working, studying etc unable to continue what they are doing by making them look at or listen to something else: Try not to distract the other students. | distract sb from: Meg was distracted from her work by the… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 distract — verb ADVERB ▪ easily ▪ He s easily distracted from his work ▪ momentarily, temporarily ▪ A noise outside momentarily distracted her. PREPOSITION …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 16 distract — v. (D; tr.) to distract from (the music distracted them from their studies) * * * [dɪs trækt] (D; tr.) to distract from (the music distracted them from their studies) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 17 distract — [dɪ strakt] verb prevent (someone) from concentrating on something. ↘divert (attention) from something. Derivatives distracted adjective distractedly adverb distracting adjective distractingly adverb distractor …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 18 distract — verb let s not distract Dionne while she s painting Syn: divert, sidetrack, draw away, disturb, put off …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 19 distract — v.tr. 1 (often foll. by from) draw away the attention of (a person, the mind, etc.). 2 bewilder, perplex. 3 (as distracted adj.) mad or angry (distracted by grief; distracted with worry). 4 amuse, esp. in order to take the attention from pain or… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 20 distract — I. adjective Date: 14th century archaic insane, mad II. transitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Latin distractus, past participle of distrahere, literally, to draw apart, from dis + trahere to draw Date: 14th century 1 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary