dismay

  • 1Dismay — Dis*may , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dismayed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Dismaying}.] [OE. desmaien, dismaien, OF. esmaier; pref. es (L. ex) + OHG. magan to be strong or able; akin to E. may. In English the pref. es was changed to dis (L. dis ). See {May}, v.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2Dismay — Dis*may , n. [Cf. OF. esmai, F. [ e]moi. See {Dismay}, v. t.] 1. Loss of courage and firmness through fear; overwhelming and disabling terror; a sinking of the spirits; consternation. [1913 Webster] I . . . can not think of such a battle without… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3dismay — vb Dismay, appall, horrify, daunt mean to unnerve and check or deter by arousing fear, apprehension, or aversion. Dismay suggests a loss of power to proceed either because a prospect is terrifying or disheartening, or, more often, because one is… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 4Dismay — Dis*may , v. i. To take dismay or fright; to be filled with dismay. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5dismay — [dis mā′] vt. [ME dismayen < Anglo Fr * desmaier < des , intens. + OFr esmayer, to deprive of power < VL * exmagare < L ex , from + Gmc base * mag, power: see MAIN] to make afraid or discouraged at the prospect of trouble or danger;… …

    English World dictionary

  • 6dismay — [n] disappointed feeling; distress agitation, alarm, anxiety, apprehension, blue funk*, blues*, bummer*, chagrin, cold feet*, consternation, discouragement, disheartenment, disillusionment, downer*, dread, dumps*, fear, fright, funk*, hassle,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7dismay — ► NOUN ▪ discouragement and distress. ► VERB ▪ cause to feel dismay. ORIGIN Old French, related to MAY(Cf. ↑may) …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8dismay — I noun affright, agitation, alarm, anxiety, apprehension, chagrin, consternation, discomfort, discomposure, discouragement, disheartenment, disquiet, doubt, dread, fret, inquietude, intimidation, misgiving, mistrust, perturbation, pique, qualm,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 9dismay — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ deep (esp. BrE), great, utter ▪ The government has expressed ‘deep dismay’ at police violence against protesters. ▪ growing ▪ widespread (esp. BrE) …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 10dismay — I n. 1) to express; feel dismay 2) dismay at, with 3) to smb. s dismay (to my dismay, he was absent again) II v. (formal) (R) it dismayed me to learn of her actions; it dismayed us that the project had been canceled * * * [dɪs meɪ] feel dismay it …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 11dismay — 1 noun (U) the worry, disappointment, and unhappiness you feel when something unpleasant happens: with/in dismay: Amanda read her exam results with dismay. | They stared at each other in dismay. | to sb s dismay: I found to my dismay that I had… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12dismay — dis|may1 [dısˈmeı] n [U] the worry, disappointment, or unhappiness you feel when something unpleasant happens with/in dismay ▪ They stared at each other in dismay. to sb s dismay ▪ I found to my dismay that I had left my notes behind. ▪ The… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13dismay — I UK [dɪsˈmeɪ] / US noun [uncountable] the feeling of being very worried, disappointed, or sad about something surprising or shocking that has happened Local people expressed their dismay at the size of the pay rise. to someone s dismay/to the… …

    English dictionary

  • 14dismay — dis|may1 [ dıs meı ] noun uncount the feeling of being very worried, disappointed, or sad about something surprising or shocking that has happened: Local people expressed their dismay at the cuts in social services. to someone s dismay/to the… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15dismay — {{11}}dismay (n.) c.1300, from DISMAY (Cf. dismay) (v.). {{12}}dismay (v.) late 13c., dismaien, from O.Fr. *desmaier (attested only in pp. dismaye), from L. de intensive prefix + O.Fr. esmaier to trouble, disturb, from V.L. *exmagare divest of… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 16dismay — [[t]dɪ̱sme͟ɪ[/t]] dismays, dismaying, dismayed 1) N UNCOUNT: oft to N with poss Dismay is a strong feeling of fear, worry, or sadness that is caused by something unpleasant and unexpected. [FORMAL] Local councillors have reacted with dismay and… …

    English dictionary

  • 17dismay — I. transitive verb (dismayed; dismaying) Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French desmaier, from des dis + maier, from Vulgar Latin * magare, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German magan to be able more at may Date: 13th century 1. to… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18dismay — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. consternation, terror; discouragement. v. t. appall; discourage. See fear, dejection. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. alarm, consternation, anxiety, disheartenment; see confusion 2 , fear 2 . v. Syn. appall,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 19dismay — [13] The underlying meaning of dismay is ‘deprive of power’ – its second syllable is ultimately the same word as the verb may. It comes via Old French desmaier from Vulgar Latin *dismagāre ‘deprive of power’, a compound verb formed from the… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 20dismay n — Dat s de end of April, said Tom in dismay …

    English expressions