disallowance

  • 1disallowance — I noun abjuration, abjurement, censorship, compliance, contradiction, contravention, countermand, declination, defeasance, denial, disaffirmation, disapproval, disavowal, disclaimer, disownment, embargo, interdiction, nonconsent, nonforbiddance,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2Disallowance — Dis al*low ance, n. The act of disallowing; refusal to admit or permit; rejection. Syn: Disapprobation; prohibition; condemnation; censure; rejection. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3disallowance — To refuse or to set aside. For example, the Trustee in Bankruptcy, under the Bankruptcy and insolvency Act, can disallow a claim submitted by a creditor. (Dictionary of Canadian Bankruptcy Terms) United Glossary of Bankruptcy Terms 2012 …

    Glossary of Bankruptcy

  • 4disallowance — disallow ► VERB ▪ declare invalid. DERIVATIVES disallowance noun …

    English terms dictionary

  • 5disallowance — “+ noun : the act of disallowing : refusal to admit or permit : rejection the taxpayer was notified of the disallowance of his claim for refund …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6disallowance — noun see disallow …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7disallowance — See disallowable. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 8disallowance — noun The action of not allowing, or of withdrawing allowance …

    Wiktionary

  • 9disallowance — (Roget s Thesaurus II) noun 1. A refusal to allow: ban, forbiddance, inhibition, interdiction, prohibition, proscription, taboo. See ALLOW. 2. A turning down of a request: denial, refusal, rejection, turndown. See ACCEPT …

    English dictionary for students

  • 10disallowance — dis·al low·ance || ‚dɪsÉ™ laÊŠÉ™ns n. prohibition, ban, rejection …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 11disallowance — dis·allowance …

    English syllables

  • 12disallowance — /dɪsəˈlaʊəns/ (say disuh lowuhns) noun 1. a refusal to allow, or admit the validity of something. 2. Government the act of the governor general or a state governor in refusing a bill or in referring it back to the parliament with suggestions for… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 13Disallowance and reservation — are constitutional powers that theoretically exist in certain Commonwealth realms to delay or overrule legislation. Originally created to retain the Crown s authority over colonial authorities across the British Empire, these powers are now… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14disallowance of trade — index embargo Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 15Loss Disallowance Rule - LDR — An Internal Revenue Service rule implemented in 1991 to prevent a consolidated group a business conglomerate filing a single tax return on behalf of its subsidiaries from taking a tax deduction for losses on the sale of a subsidiary s stock. The… …

    Investment dictionary

  • 16Separate Schools, New Brunswick —    C Public opinion aroused in Quebec, 73; Costigan and other Roman Catholic members from New Brunswick demand disallowance of bill against, 73 74; Macdonald and Cartier oppose disallowance, 74 76; question becomes an issue in Quebec elections,… …

    The makers of Canada

  • 17Canadian federalism — For the political ideology that favours Quebec remaining within the Canadian federation rather than pursuing independence, see Quebec federalist ideology. Canada This article is part of the series: Politics and government of Canada …

    Wikipedia

  • 18prohibition — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Act of forbidding Nouns prohibition, inhibition, forbiddance, disallowance, restriction (see restraint); veto, injunction, interdict[ion], proscription; preclusion, exclusion; embargo, ban, taboo, gag… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 19Jesuits' Estates Act —    Passed by the Mercier government in Quebec, 1888. Following the suppression of the Society of Jesus by the pope, in 1773, the property of the order in Canada became vested in the crown, and was set apart for purposes of education in the… …

    The makers of Canada

  • 20United Kingdom legislation — derives from a number of different sources. The United Kingdom does not have a single body of legislation, but is divided into three states, each with its own laws and legal system: England and Wales (English law), Scotland (Scots law), and… …

    Wikipedia