disadvantage

  • 1 disadvantage — n Disadvantage, detriment, handicap, drawback mean something which interferes with the success or well being of a person or thing. Disadvantage often implies an act, circumstance, or condition which threatens to affect or does actually affect a… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 2 Disadvantage — Dis ad*van tage (?; 48, 61), n. [Cf. F. d[ e]savantage.] 1. Deprivation of advantage; unfavorable or prejudicial quality, condition, circumstance, or the like; that which hinders success, or causes loss or injury. [1913 Webster] I was brought… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 disadvantage — [dis΄əd vant′ij] n. [ME disavauntage < OFr desavantage: see DIS & ADVANTAGE] 1. an unfavorable situation or circumstance; drawback; handicap 2. loss or injury, as to reputation or credit; detriment vt. disadvantaged, disadvantaging to act to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 disadvantage — I noun adverse circumstance, adversity, block, blockade, blockage, burden, check, curb, damage, defect, deficiency, detainment, determent, deterrence, deterrent, detriment, difficulty, disability, disablement, discommodity, discouragement,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 disadvantage — [n2] hurt, loss damage, deprivation, detriment, disservice, harm, injury, prejudice; concepts 230,309,679 Ant. advantage, benefit, blessing, gain, profit disadvantage(s) [n1] difficulty, trouble adverse circumstance, bar, blocking, burden, defect …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 Disadvantage — Dis ad*van tage, v. t. [Cf. F. d[ e]savantager.] To injure the interest of; to be detrimental to. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 disadvantage — (n.) late 14c., disavauntage, from O.Fr. desavantage (13c.), from des (see DIS (Cf. dis )) + avantage (see ADVANTAGE (Cf. advantage)). The verb is attested from 1530s, from the noun …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 disadvantage — ► NOUN ▪ an unfavourable circumstance or condition. ► VERB 1) put in an unfavourable position. 2) (disadvantaged) in socially or economically deprived circumstances. DERIVATIVES disadvantageous adjective …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 Disadvantage — Part of the series Policy Debate Organization Policy debate competitions Inter Collegiate policy debate Format Structure of policy debate · Resolution Constructive · Reb …

    Wikipedia

  • 10 disadvantage — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ big, considerable, decided (esp. AmE), distinct, grave, great, huge, major, obvious, real, serious …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 11 disadvantage — n. 1) to offset, outweigh a disadvantage 2) a decided disadvantage 3) a disadvantage for, to 4) a disadvantage to + inf. (it was a disadvantage not to have a car available = it was a disadvantage not having a car available) 5) at a disadvantage… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 12 disadvantage — dis|ad|van|tage1 [ˌdısədˈva:ntıdʒ US ˈvæn ] n [U and C] something that causes problems, or that makes someone or something less likely to be successful or effective ≠ ↑advantage disadvantage of ▪ The main disadvantage of the material is that it… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 disadvantage — dis|ad|van|tage1 [ ,dısəd væntıdʒ ] noun count or uncount ** something that makes someone or something less effective, successful, or attractive: Grants are available for projects that tackle disadvantage in deprived areas. disadvantage of: One… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 disadvantage — [[t]dɪ̱sədvɑ͟ːntɪʤ, væ̱n [/t]] disadvantages 1) N COUNT: oft N of n A disadvantage is a factor which makes someone or something less useful, acceptable, or successful than other people or things. His two main rivals suffer the disadvantage of… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 disadvantage — I UK [ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒ] / US [ˌdɪsədˈvæntɪdʒ] noun [countable/uncountable] Word forms disadvantage : singular disadvantage plural disadvantages ** something that makes someone or something less effective, successful, or attractive Grants are… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 disadvantage — noun (C, U) an unfavourable condition or quality that makes someone or something less likely to be successful or effective (+ of): The main disadvantage of the project is the cost. (+ to): There are some disadvantages to his proposal. | be at a… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 disadvantage — I. noun Etymology: Middle English disavauntage, from Anglo French desavantage, from des dis + avantage advantage Date: 14th century 1. loss or damage especially to reputation, credit, or finances ; detriment < the deal worked to their… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 disadvantage — /dis euhd van tij, vahn /, n., v., disadvantaged, disadvantaging. n. 1. absence or deprivation of advantage or equality. 2. the state or an instance of being in an unfavorable circumstance or condition: to be at a disadvantage. 3. something that… …

    Universalium

  • 19 disadvantage — 1. noun /ˌdɪsədˈvɑːntɪdʒ,ˌdɪsədˈvæntɪdʒ/ a) A weakness or undesirable characteristic; a con. The disadvantage to owning a food processor is that you have to store it somewhere. b) A setback or handicap …

    Wiktionary

  • 20 disadvantage — dis•ad•van•tage [[t]ˌdɪs ədˈvæn tɪdʒ, ˈvɑn [/t]] n. v. taged, tag•ing 1) absence or deprivation of advantage or equality 2) the state or an instance of being in an unfavorable circumstance or condition: to be at a disadvantage[/ex] 3) something… …

    From formal English to slang