dialect

  • 1 dialect — DIALÉCT, dialecte, s.n. 1. Ramificaţie teritorială a unei limbi, cuprinzând adesea mai multe graiuri. 2. (impr.) Grai. 3. (impr.) Limbă. [pr.: di a ] – Din fr. dialecte, lat. dialectus. Trimis de romac, 03.03.2004. Sursa: DEX 98  DIALÉCT s. ( …

    Dicționar Român

  • 2 dialect — n 1 Dialect, vernacular, patois, lingo, jargon, cant, argot, slang denote a form of language or a style of speech which varies from that accepted as the literary standard. Dialect (see also LANGUAGE 1) is applied ordinarily to a form of a… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3 dialect — is the language form of a region, and varies from the standard language in matters of vocabulary, grammar, and pronunciation. Some dialects are also related to social class and ethnic origin. The dialects of the United Kingdom are recorded in… …

    Modern English usage

  • 4 dialect — [dī′ə lekt΄] n. [L dialectus < Gr dialektos, discourse, discussion, dialect < dialegesthai, to discourse, talk < dia, between (see DIA ) + legein, to choose, talk (see LOGIC)] 1. the sum total of local characteristics of speech 2. Rare… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 Dialect — Di a*lect, n. [F. dialecte, L. dialectus, fr. Gr. ?, fr. ? to converse, discourse. See {Dialogue}.] 1. Means or mode of expressing thoughts; language; tongue; form of speech. [1913 Webster] This book is writ in such a dialect As may the minds of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 dialect —    Dialect identifies groups within a language. Some people’s speech displays features differentiating it from that used by members of other groups, although those belonging to either group can communicate with each other without excessive… …

    Encyclopedia of contemporary British culture

  • 7 dialect — dialect; in·ter·dialect; trans·dialect; …

    English syllables

  • 8 dialect — (n.) 1570s, form of speech of a region or group, from M.Fr. dialecte, from L. dialectus local language, way of speaking, conversation, from Gk. dialektos talk, conversation, speech; also the language of a country, dialect, from dialegesthai… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 dialect — index language, phraseology, speech Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 10 dialect — [n] local speech accent, argot, cant, idiom, jargon, language, lingo, localism, patois, patter, pronunciation, provincialism, regionalism, slang, terminology, tongue, vernacular, vocabulary; concept 276 …

    New thesaurus

  • 11 dialect — ► NOUN ▪ a form of a language which is peculiar to a specific region or social group. DERIVATIVES dialectal adjective. ORIGIN originally in the sense «dialectic»: from Greek dialektos discourse, way of speaking …

    English terms dictionary

  • 12 Dialect — This article is about dialects of spoken and written languages. For dialects of programming languages, see Dialect (computing). For the literary device, see Eye dialect. The term dialect (from the Greek Language word dialektos, Διάλεκτος) is used …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 dialect — /duy euh lekt /, n. 1. Ling. a variety of a language that is distinguished from other varieties of the same language by features of phonology, grammar, and vocabulary, and by its use by a group of speakers who are set off from others… …

    Universalium

  • 14 dialect — Synonyms and related words: Acadian, Anglo Indian, Brooklynese, Cajun, Canadian French, Cockney, French Canadian, Gullah, Midland, Midland dialect, New England dialect, Pennsylvania Dutch, Yankee, Yorkshire, accent, argot, brogue, bundle of… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 15 dialect — n. 1) to speak (in) a dialect 2) a local, regional; social; standard dialect * * * [ daɪəlekt] regional social standard dialect a local to speak (in) a dialect …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 16 dialect — di|a|lect [ˈdaıəlekt] n [U and C] [Date: 1500 1600; : French; Origin: dialecte, from Greek dialektos conversation, dialect , from dialegesthai to talk to someone ] a form of a language which is spoken only in one area, with words or grammar that… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 dialect — noun the island dialect was influenced by the Spanish in the sixteenth century Syn: regional language, local language, local speech, vernacular, patois, idiom; regionalisms, localisms; informal lingo •• dialect, argot, cant, jargon, lingo, slang …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 18 dialect — /ˈdaɪəlɛkt / (say duyuhlekt) noun 1. one of the forms of a given language which differ from one another in details of sound system, lexis, grammar, etc., each of which is usually to be found in a particular region or social class, but the… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 19 dialect — noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle French dialecte, from Latin dialectus, from Greek dialektos conversation, dialect, from dialegesthai to converse more at dialogue Date: 1577 1. a. a regional variety of …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20 dialect — noun /ˈdɑɪ.ə.ˌlɛkt/ a) A variety of a language (specifically, often a spoken variety) that is characteristic of a particular area, community or group, often with relatively minor differences in vocabulary, style, spelling and pronunciation. A… …

    Wiktionary