deliciousness

  • 1Deliciousness — De*li cious*ness, n. 1. The quality of being delicious; as, the deliciousness of a repast. [1913 Webster] 2. Luxury. To drive away all superfluity and deliciousness. Sir T. North. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2deliciousness — mid 15c., from DELICIOUS (Cf. delicious) + NESS (Cf. ness) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3deliciousness — delicious ► ADJECTIVE 1) highly pleasant to the taste. 2) delightful: a delicious irony. DERIVATIVES deliciously adverb deliciousness noun. ORIGIN Latin deliciosus, from deliciae delight, pleasure …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4deliciousness — noun see delicious …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 5deliciousness — See deliciously. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 6deliciousness — noun The state or quality of being delicious …

    Wiktionary

  • 7deliciousness — n. delightfulness; tastiness, savoriness …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 8deliciousness — de·li·cious·ness …

    English syllables

  • 9deliciousness — noun extreme appetizingness • Syn: ↑delectability, ↑lusciousness, ↑toothsomeness • Derivationally related forms: ↑toothsome (for: ↑toothsomeness) • …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 10The Next Iron Chef — Who will climb the ranks to culinary greatness? Format Reality, Cooking Starring Alton Brown Mark Dacascos …

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  • 11Daintiness — Dain ti*ness, n. The quality of being dainty; nicety; niceness; elegance; delicacy; deliciousness; fastidiousness; squeamishness. [1913 Webster] The daintiness and niceness of our captains Hakluyt. [1913 Webster] More notorious for the daintiness …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12delicious — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin deliciosus, from Latin deliciae delights, from delicere to allure Date: 14th century 1. affording great pleasure ; delightful < delicious anecdotes > 2 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 13Taiwanese cuisine — (traditional Chinese: 台灣菜; simplified Chinese: 台湾菜; pinyin: Táiwāncài; Pe̍h ōe jī: Tâi oân liāu lí) has several variations. In addition to the following representative dishes from the people of Hoklo …

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  • 14Chloroform — IUPAC name …

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  • 15Charles Jeremiah Wells — (1798? – February 17, 1879) was an English poet. Life He was born in London, probably in the year 1798. He was educated at Cowden Clarke s school at Edmonton, with Tom Keats, the younger brother of the poet, and with RH Horne. He …

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  • 16Jerry Traunfeld — is an American chef and author, was the executive chef of The Herbfarm restaurant in Woodinville, Washington. He was the chef at The Herbfarm from July 1990 to November 2007. Prior to that he was the executive chef of the Alexis Hotel in Seattle&#8230; …

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  • 17Bivona — Infobox CityIT official name = Comune di Bivona img coa = Bivona Stemma.png img coa small = image caption = region = RegioneIT|sigla=SIC province = ProvinciaIT (short form)|sigla=AG (AG) mayor = Vincenzo Di Salvo (from May 2002) mayor party =&#8230; …

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  • 18Bob chorba — ( bg. боб чорба) is a national Bulgarian dish. The name translates to bean soup . It is a soup made from dry beans, onions, tomatoes, chubritza or djodjen (spearmint) and carrots.Due to its simplicity and deliciousness, it is by far the single&#8230; …

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  • 19Wok hei — is a term in Cantonese Chinese referring to the flavour, tastes, and essence imparted by a hot wok on the food. The word hei (romanization based on Cantonese Chinese) is equivalent to qi (Mandarin). The term is sometimes rendered as wok chi in&#8230; …

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  • 20Cannibalism in popular culture — Cannibalism is a recurring theme in popular cultureLiteratureCannibalism in literature, a species of horror fiction, is represented by some significant works: * William Shakespeare s Titus Andronicus , in which Tamora is unknowingly served a pie&#8230; …

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