comport

  • 1 Comport — Com*port , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Comported}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Comporting}.] [F. comporter, LL. comportare, fr.L. comportare to bring together; com + portare to carry. See {Port demeanor}.] 1. To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to comport… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Comport — Com port (?, formerly ?), n. [Cf. OF. comport.] Manner of acting; behavior; conduct; deportment. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] I knew them well, and marked their rude comport. Dryden. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 Comport — Com*port , v. t. 1. To bear; to endure; to brook; to put with. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The malcontented sort That never can the present state comport. Daniel. [1913 Webster] 2. To carry; to conduct; with a reflexive pronoun. [1913 Webster] Observe… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 comport — ► VERB (comport oneself) formal ▪ conduct oneself; behave. ORIGIN Latin comportare, from portare carry, bear …

    English terms dictionary

  • 5 comport — I (agree with) verb accord with, attune, be accordant, be applicable, be apposite, be appropriate, be apt, be consistent, be consonant, be in accordance with, be in keeping, be in tune with, be suitable, become, befit, belong, chime in with,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 6 comport — (v.) late 14c., from M.Fr. comporter endure, admit, behave (13c.), from L. comportare to bring together, collect, from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) + portare to carry (see PORT (Cf. port) (1)). Meaning to agree with, suit (with with …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 7 comport — acquit, quit, demean, *behave, conduct, deport …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 8 comport — [kəm pôrt′] vt. [ME comporten < OFr comporter, to allow, admit of < L comportare, to bring together < com , together + portare, carry: see FARE] to behave or conduct (oneself) in a specified manner vi. to agree or accord (with) SYN.… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 comport — v. (formal) (P; refl.) to comport oneself with dignity; to comport oneself well * * * [ kɒmpɔːt] to comport oneself well (formal) (P; refl.) to comport oneself with dignity …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 10 comport — com|port [kəmˈpo:t US ˈpo:rt] v formal [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: comporter to carry, lead , from Latin comportare to bring together , from com ( COM ) + portare to carry ] comport yourself to behave in a particular way ▪ He… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 comport — UK [kəmˈpɔː(r)t] / US [kəmˈpɔrt] verb Word forms comport : present tense I/you/we/they comport he/she/it comports present participle comporting past tense comported past participle comported comport yourself …

    English dictionary

  • 12 comport — I. /kəmˈpɔt / (say kuhm pawt) phrase 1. comport oneself, to bear or conduct oneself; behave: *Nobody could accuse them of not trying to comport themselves. –patrick white, 1976. 2. comport with, to agree or accord with; suit. {French comporter… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 13 comport — [[t]kəmpɔ͟ː(r)t[/t]] comports, comporting, comported VERB If you comport yourself in a particular way, you behave in that way. [FORMAL] [V pron refl prep/adv] He comports himself with modesty... [V pron refl prep/adv] They should be able to… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 comport — comport1 [kəm pɔ:t] verb 1》 (comport oneself) formal conduct oneself; behave. 2》 (comport with) archaic accord or agree with. Origin ME (in the sense tolerate ): from L. comportare, from com together + portare carry, bear . comport2 [ kɒmpɔ:t …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 15 comport — com•port [[t]kəmˈpɔrt, ˈpoʊrt[/t]] v. t. 1) to bear or conduct (oneself); behave: to comport oneself with dignity[/ex] 2) to be in agreement, harmony, or conformity (usu. followed by with): to comport with the facts[/ex] • Etymology: 1350–1400;… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 16 comport — I. verb Etymology: Middle French comporter to bear, conduct, from Latin comportare to bring together, from com + portare to carry more at fare Date: 1589 intransitive verb to be fitting ; accord < actions that comport with policy > transitive… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 comport — comport1 /keuhm pawrt , pohrt /, v.t. 1. to bear or conduct (oneself); behave: He comported himself with dignity. v.i. 2. to be in agreement, harmony, or conformity (usually followed by with): His statement does not comport with the facts. n. 3.… …

    Universalium

  • 18 comport — verb /kəmˈpɔːt,kəmˈpoɹt/ a) To be in agreement (with); to be of an accord. The new rules did not seem to comport with the spirit of the club. b) To behave (in a given manner). She comported herself with grace …

    Wiktionary

  • 19 Comport — This interesting name, with variant spellings Compfort, Compford, Comford and Comport, derives from the Medieval English Cumfort , (Old French Cunfort or Confort ), meaning encouragement, aid, or support, and was originally given as a personal… …

    Surnames reference

  • 20 comport — com|port [ kəm pɔrt ] verb comport yourself VERY FORMAL to behave in a particular way …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English