cock-a-hoop

  • 1cock-a-hoop — [ˌkɔk ə ˈhu:p US ˌka:k ] adj [not before noun] BrE [Date: 1600 1700; Origin: set the cock on the hoop to celebrate (16 17 centuries)] pleased and excited about something, especially something you have done cock a hoop at/about/over ▪ Robert s… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 2cock-a-hoop — a. Boastful; defiant; exulting. Also used adverbially. Syn: boastful, braggart(prenominal), bragging(prenominal), braggy, big, crowing, self aggrandizing, vainglorious. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3cock-a-hoop — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ extremely pleased. ORIGIN from the phrase set cock a hoop, apparently denoting the action of turning on a tap and allowing liquor to flow …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4cock-a-hoop — [käk΄ə ho͞op′] adj. [Fr coq à huppe, cock with a crest] 1. in very high spirits; elated; exultant 2. boastful; conceited …

    English World dictionary

  • 5cock-a-hoop — /kok euh hoohp , hoop , kok euh hoohp , hoop /, adj. 1. in a state of unrestrained joy or exultation; boastfully elated: He was cock a hoop over his victory. 2. askew; out of kilter: He knocked his hat cock a hoop. [1520 30; orig. uncert.] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 6cock-a-hoop — [16] Cock a hoop comes from a 16th and 17th century expression set the cock on the hoop ‘make merry’ – but exactly how the expression arose is not clear. One obvious interpretation is that it meant ‘put the tap on the barrel’ – that is, let the… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 7cock-a-hoop — [16] Cock a hoop comes from a 16th and 17th century expression set the cock on the hoop ‘make merry’ – but exactly how the expression arose is not clear. One obvious interpretation is that it meant ‘put the tap on the barrel’ – that is, let the… …

    Word origins

  • 8cock-a-hoop — adjective Etymology: from the phrase to set cock a hoop to be festive Date: 1663 1. triumphantly boastful ; exulting 2. awry …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9cock-a-hoop — adjective Exultant, very happy, triumphant. I have to say I felt pretty cock a hoop straight after my epidural but, some hours later, my head felt as though someone large and heavy had been sitting on it …

    Wiktionary

  • 10cock-a-hoop — ADJ: usu v link ADJ If you are cock a hoop, you are extremely pleased about something that you have done. [INFORMAL, OLD FASHIONED] …

    English dictionary

  • 11cock-a-hoop — adjective extremely pleased. Origin C17: from the phr. set cock a hoop, of unknown origin, appar. denoting the action of turning on a tap and allowing liquor to flow …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 12cock-a-hoop — adjective (not before noun) pleased and excited about something, especially something you have done (+ at/about): Robert s cock a hoop about his new job …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13cock-a-hoop — adj. & adv. adj. exultant; crowing boastfully. adv. exultantly. Etymology: 16th c.: orig. in phr. set cock a hoop denoting some action preliminary to hard drinking …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 14cock-a-hoop — joyfully, happily, gladly, cheerfully …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 15cock-a-hoop — a. Boasting, boastful, bragging, vaunting, vaporing, blustering, exulting, triumphant, vain glorious …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 16cock-a-hoop — UK / US adjective pleased and proud about something that you have done …

    English dictionary

  • 17cock-a-hoop — [[t]ˌkɒk əˈhup, ˈhʊp, ˈkɒk əˌhup, ˌhʊp[/t]] adj. 1) boastfully elated 2) askew; out of kilter • Etymology: 1520–30; orig. uncert …

    From formal English to slang

  • 18cock-a-hoop — /kɒk ə ˈhup/ (say kok uh hoohp) adjective in a state of unrestrained joy or exultation …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 19Cock and Hoop Court —    Out of Addle Hill. In Castle Baynard Ward (Strype, ed. 1720, I. iii. 230, to Boyle, 1799).    Not named in the maps.    Name derived from the sign …

    Dictionary of London

  • 20Cock and Hoop Yard —    East out of Houndsditch. In Portsoken Ward (in O.S. 1880 ed.).    Earliest mention: O. and M. 1677.    Removed for extension of Stoney Lane into Houndsditch, July, 1899 …

    Dictionary of London