cajoling

  • 1cajoling — index persuasion Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2Cajoling — Cajole Ca*jole , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Cajoled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cajoling}.] [F. cajoler, orig., to chatter like a bird in a cage, to sing; hence, to amuse with idle talk, to flatter, from the source of OF. goale, jaiole, F. ge[^o]le, dim. of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3cajoling — ca·jole || kÉ™ dʒəʊl v. persuade; tempt, entice, beguile; entrap …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 4cajoling — …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 5international relations — a branch of political science dealing with the relations between nations. [1970 75] * * * Study of the relations of states with each other and with international organizations and certain subnational entities (e.g., bureaucracies and political… …

    Universalium

  • 6sweet-talk — /sweet tawk /, Informal. v.i. 1. to use cajoling words. v.t. 2. to use cajoling words on in order to persuade; soft soap: They tried to sweet talk the boss into giving them raises. [1925 30] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 7sweet-talk — sweet′ talk v. t. Informal. 1) inf to use cajoling words on; flatter 2) inf to use cajoling words • Etymology: 1925–30 …

    From formal English to slang

  • 8blarney — n. & v. n. 1 cajoling talk; flattery. 2 nonsense. v. ( eys, eyed) 1 tr. flatter (a person) with blarney. 2 intr. talk flatteringly. Etymology: Blarney, an Irish castle near Cork with a stone said to confer a cajoling tongue on whoever kisses it …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 9Cajole — Ca*jole , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Cajoled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cajoling}.] [F. cajoler, orig., to chatter like a bird in a cage, to sing; hence, to amuse with idle talk, to flatter, from the source of OF. goale, jaiole, F. ge[^o]le, dim. of cage a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10Cajoled — Cajole Ca*jole , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Cajoled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Cajoling}.] [F. cajoler, orig., to chatter like a bird in a cage, to sing; hence, to amuse with idle talk, to flatter, from the source of OF. goale, jaiole, F. ge[^o]le, dim. of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11Cajolement — Ca*jole ment, n. The act of cajoling; the state of being cajoled; cajolery. Coleridge. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12Cajoleries — Cajolery Ca*jol er*y, n.; pl. {Cajoleries}. A wheedling to delude; words used in cajoling; flattery. Infamous cajoleries. Evelyn. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13Cajolery — Ca*jol er*y, n.; pl. {Cajoleries}. A wheedling to delude; words used in cajoling; flattery. Infamous cajoleries. Evelyn. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14cajole — transitive verb (cajoled; cajoling) Etymology: French cajoler Date: 1630 1. a. to persuade with flattery or gentle urging especially in the face of reluctance ; coax < had to cajole …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 15come on — intransitive verb Date: 15th century 1. a. to advance by degrees < darkness came on > b. to begin by degrees < rain came on toward noon > 2. a. please used in cajoling or pleading b. used …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16lure — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French lure, leure, of Germanic origin; akin to Middle High German luoder bait; perhaps akin to Old English lathian to invite, Old High German ladōn Date: 14th century 1. an object usually of leather&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson — Horatio Nelson and Lord Nelson redirect here. For other uses, see Horatio Nelson (disambiguation) and Lord Nelson (disambiguation). Vice Admiral The Right Honourable The Viscount Nelson KB …

    Wikipedia

  • 18Höðr — (often anglicized as Hod [The name Höðr is thought to be related to höð , battle , and mean something like killer . This would seem to fit with the god s mythological role. In the standardized Old Norse orthography the name is spelled&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 19The Hobbit — ] the narrative voice contributes significantly to the success of the novel, and the story is, therefore, often read aloud. [cite web |url=http://www.cliffsnotes.com/WileyCDA/LitNote/The Hobbit Critical Essays Major Themes.id 171,pageNum 68.html&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 20Charles X of France — Charles X redirects here. For the King of Sweden, see Charles X Gustav of Sweden, for the Catholic claimant of 1589, see Charles, Cardinal de Bourbon. Charles X King Charles X by François Pascal Simon Gérard, 1825 …

    Wikipedia