bring+to+notice

  • 1 bring to notice — index address (direct attention to), exhibit, manifest Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 bring forth — Synonyms and related words: affect, arouse, author, bear, bear fruit, beget, betoken, birth, born, brandish, breathe, breed, bring about, bring forward, bring into being, bring into view, bring out, bring to effect, bring to light, bring to… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 3 bring forward — Synonyms and related words: acculturate, adduce, advance, affect, affront, allege, ameliorate, amend, array, betoken, better, boost, brandish, brave, breast, breathe, bring before, bring forth, bring into view, bring on, bring out, bring to bear …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 4 bring out — Synonyms and related words: affect, arouse, betoken, brandish, breathe, bring forth, bring forward, bring into view, bring to light, bring to notice, call forth, call out, call up, chime in, come out with, dangle, declare, deduce, deliver,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 5 bring something to light — REVEAL, disclose, expose, uncover, show up, unearth, dig up/out, bring to notice, identify, hunt out, nose out. → light * * * bring something to light come to light phrase if facts are brought to light or come to light, people discover them New… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6 bring something to light — the surprise inspection brought some incriminating evidence to light Syn: reveal, disclose, expose, uncover, unearth, dig up/out, bring to notice, identify …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 7 bring something to someone's notice — bring something to someone’s notice british formal phrase to tell someone about something Their working conditions were only brought to public notice last year. I’ll bring the situation to his notice at the first opportunity. Thesaurus: to… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 8 bring — W1S1 [brıŋ] v past tense and past participle brought [bro:t US bro:t] [T] [: Old English; Origin: bringan] 1.) a) to take something or someone with you to the place where you are now, or to the place you are talking about →↑take ▪ Did you bring… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 9 notice — no·tice 1 n 1 a: a notification or communication of a fact, claim, demand, or proceeding see also process, service ◇ The requirements of when, how, and what notice must be given to a person are often prescribed by a statute, rule, or contract. b …

    Law dictionary

  • 10 notice to quit — n. Notice given by a tenant informing the landlord that the tenant intends to move out; also, notice given by a landlord informing the tenant that he or she must move out. The Essential Law Dictionary. Sphinx Publishing, An imprint of Sourcebooks …

    Law dictionary

  • 11 notice — 1 verb (intransitive, transitive not in progressive) 1 to see, hear, or feel something: He spilled the tea, but Miss Whitley did not notice. | notice sth/sb: You may notice a numb feeling in your fingers. | notice that: Catherine noticed that… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 notice — no|tice1 [ noutıs ] verb transitive *** to become conscious of someone or something by seeing, hearing, or feeling them: I noticed that the door was open. After a few days here you hardly notice the rain! Did you notice how pale he looks? get… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 notice — Information; the result of observation, whether by the senses or the mind; knowledge of the existence of a fact or state of affairs; the means of knowledge. Intelligence by whatever means communicated. Koehn v. Central Nat. Ins. Co. of Omaha, Neb …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 14 notice — Information; the result of observation, whether by the senses or the mind; knowledge of the existence of a fact or state of affairs; the means of knowledge. Intelligence by whatever means communicated. Koehn v. Central Nat. Ins. Co. of Omaha, Neb …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 15 bring sth about phrasal — verb (T) to make something happen: Computers have brought about many changes in the workplace. bring sb/sth around/round phrasal verb (T) 1 bring the conversation around/round to to deliberately and gradually introduce a new subject into a… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 bring — /brɪŋ / (say bring) verb (t) (brought, bringing) 1. to cause to come with oneself; take along to the place or person sought; conduct or convey. 2. to cause to come, as to a recipient or possessor, to the mind or knowledge, into a particular… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 17 notice — no|tice1 W2S1 [ˈnəutıs US ˈnou ] v [I,T not in progressive] 1.) if you notice something or someone, you realize that they exist, especially because you can see, hear, or feel them ▪ He noticed a woman in a black dress sitting across from him. ▪ I …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 notice — [[t]no͟ʊtɪs[/t]] ♦♦ notices, noticing, noticed 1) VERB If you notice something or someone, you become aware of them. [V n] He stressed that people should not hesitate to contact the police if they ve noticed any strangers in Hankham recently...… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 bring — verb /brIN/ past tense and past participle brought /brO:t/ (T) 1 to take someone or something to the place you are now, to the place you are going to, or to the place that you have been talking about: Did you bring anything to drink? | Sheila was …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 20 notice — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 attention ADJECTIVE ▪ public ▪ The disease came to public notice in the 80s. VERB + NOTICE ▪ take ▪ Take no notice of what you read in the papers …

    Collocations dictionary


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