bring+down

  • 1 bring down — index cause, demean (make lower), demote, depress, derogate, disgrace, dispatch (put to death), overthrow …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 bring down on — bring (something) down (on (someone)) to cause something to have influence or power over someone. Why would you bring down that kind of attention if you were trying not to be noticed? We don t bring violence down on people. People bring it down… …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 3 bring down — (someone/something) to remove a person or a government from power. The demonstrations reminded me of the troubles that brought down the president. The students were not just asking for reforms, they wanted to bring down the government …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 4 bring down — [v] reduce or hurt abase, cut down, damage, drop, fell, floor, injure, knock down, KO*, lay low, level, lower, mow down, murder*, overthrow, overturn, prostrate, pull down, shoot down, slay*, throw down, tumble, undermine, upset, wound; concepts… …

    New thesaurus

  • 5 bring down — verb 1. move something or somebody to a lower position (Freq. 3) take down the vase from the shelf • Syn: ↑lower, ↑take down, ↑let down, ↑get down • Ant: ↑raise ( …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6 bring down — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms bring down : present tense I/you/we/they bring down he/she/it brings down present participle bringing down past tense brought down past participle brought down 1) to cause a government or politician to lose… …

    English dictionary

  • 7 bring down — v. 1) (mil.) (D; tr.) ( to call for ) to bring down on (the artillery spotter brought down fire on the enemy tanks) 2) (D; tr.) ( to reduce ) to bring down to (they finally brought the price down to a reasonable figure) * * * [ brɪŋ daʊn] (mil.)… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 8 bring-down — 1. n. something that depresses someone. □ The news was a terrible bring down. □ Just to see your face was a bring down. 2. n. something that brings someone back to reality. □ The bill for the week’s stay was a real bring down …

    Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • 9 bring down — 1) he was brought down by his own teammate Syn: trip, knock over, knock down; foul 2) I couldn t bear to bring her down Syn: depress, sadden, upset, get down, dispirit, dishearten, discourage 3) …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 10 bring down — 1) PHRASAL VERB When people or events bring down a government or ruler, they cause the government or ruler to lose power. [V P n (not pron)] They were threatening to bring down the government by withdrawing from the ruling coalition... [V n P]… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 bring down — verb a) To make a legitimate rulership lose their position of power. The rebel forces are trying to bring down the president and his government. b) To reduce The latest budget reforms are intended to bring down the level of inflation. Syn …

    Wiktionary

  • 12 bring down — phr verb Bring down is used with these nouns as the object: ↑cost, ↑fever, ↑government, ↑inflation, ↑level, ↑opponent, ↑price, ↑temperature, ↑unemployment, ↑wrath …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 13 bring-down — n Disappointment, a saddening event. The news of the crash was a major bring down. 1980s …

    Historical dictionary of American slang

  • 14 bring down — bring (something) down 1. to reduce something. Drugs can bring your blood pressure down. 2. to cause something to fail. Dozens of Web sites were brought down by these software programs …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 15 bring down — Synonyms and related words: abase, abash, acquire, be responsible for, beat down, belittle, blow down, blow over, blow to pieces, blow up, bowl down, bowl over, brain, break down, bring into discredit, bring low, bring on, bring upon, bulldog,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 16 bring down — I (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To kill] Syn. slay, murder, cut down, mow down*; see kill 1 . 2. [To cause to fall] Syn. injure, wound, overthrow; see fell , hurt 1 , oust . II (Roget s Thesaurus II) verb 1. To cause to fall, as from a shot or blow: cut… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 17 bring down — vb to depress or disappoint. A black Ameri can and beatnik term, like the other phrasal verbs come down and put down, adopted in Britain in the early 1960s by jazz enthusiasts among others. The phrase became one of the standard items in the hippy …

    Contemporary slang

  • 18 bring down — /ˌbrɪŋ daυn/ verb 1. to reduce ● Petrol companies have brought down the price of oil. 2. same as bring forward …

    Dictionary of banking and finance

  • 19 bring down — {v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To deflate (someone s ego). * /John brought Ted down very cleverly with his remarks./ 2. To depress (someone). * /The funeral brought me down completely./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20 bring down — {v. phr.}, {slang}, {informal} 1. To deflate (someone s ego). * /John brought Ted down very cleverly with his remarks./ 2. To depress (someone). * /The funeral brought me down completely./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms


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