betide

  • 1 Betide — Be*tide (b[ e]*t[imac]d ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Betided}, Obs. {Betid}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Betiding}.] [OE. bitiden; pref. bi , be + tiden, fr. AS. t[=i]dan, to happen, fr. t[=i]d time. See {Tide}.] To happen to; to befall; to come to; as, woe… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Betide — Be*tide , v. i. To come to pass; to happen; to occur. [1913 Webster] A salve for any sore that may betide. Shak. [1913 Webster] Note: Shakespeare has used it with of. What would betide of me ? [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 betide — (v.) to happen, befall, late 12c., from BE (Cf. be ) + tiden to happen (see TIDE (Cf. tide)) …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 betide — befall, *happen, chance, occur, transpire …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5 betide — ► VERB literary ▪ happen; befall …

    English terms dictionary

  • 6 betide — [bē tīd′, bitīd′] vi., vt. betided, betiding [ME bitiden < be , BE + tiden, happen < OE tidan < tid, time: see TIDE1] to happen (to); befall …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 betide — /bəˈtaɪd / (say buh tuyd), /bi / (say bee ) verb (betided, betiding) Archaic –verb (t) 1. to happen to; befall; come to: woe betide the villain! –verb (i) 2. to come to pass. {Middle English betide(n), from be + tiden, Old English tīdan betide} …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 8 betide — verb Date: 12th century intransitive verb to happen especially as if by fate transitive verb to happen to ; befall used chiefly in the phrase woe betide < woe betide our enemies > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9 betide — be|tide [bıˈtaıd] v [Date: 1100 1200; Origin: tide to happen (11 19 centuries), from Old English tidan] woe betide sb used to say that someone will be in trouble if they do something often humorous ▪ Woe betide anyone who wakes the baby! …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 betide — [[t]bɪta͟ɪd[/t]] PHRASE: PHR n If you say woe betide anyone who does a particular thing, you mean that something unpleasant will happen to them if they do it. [FORMAL] Woe betide anyone who got in his way …

    English dictionary

  • 11 betide — verb woe betide you used, especially humorously, to say that someone will be in trouble if they do something: Woe betide anyone who wakes the baby! …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 betide — v. (only in infin. and 3rd sing. subj.) 1 tr. happen to (woe betide him). 2 intr. happen (whate er may betide). Etymology: ME f. obs. tide befall f. OE tidan …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 13 betide — /bi tuyd /, v., betided, betiding. v.t. 1. to happen to; come to; befall: Woe betide the villain! v.i. 2. to happen; come to pass: Whatever betides, maintain your courage. [1125 75; ME betiden. See BE , TIDE2] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 14 betide — be•tide [[t]bɪˈtaɪd[/t]] v. tid•ed, tid•ing. 1) cvb to happen to; befall: Woe betide the villain![/ex] 2) to happen • Etymology: 1125–75; ME …

    From formal English to slang

  • 15 betide — verb a) To happen to. b) To happen; to take place; to bechance or befall …

    Wiktionary

  • 16 betide — Synonyms and related words: be found, be met with, be realized, bechance, befall, break, chance, come, come about, come along, come down, come off, come to pass, come true, develop, eventuate, fall, fall out, go, go off, hap, happen, happen along …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 17 betide — (Roget s Thesaurus II) verb 1. To happen to one: befall, come. See HAPPEN. 2. To take place: befall, come, come about, come off, develop, hap, happen, occur, pass, transpire. Idiom: come to pass. See HAPPEN …

    English dictionary for students

  • 18 betide — v. n. == happen. RG. 418, 14 …

    Oldest English Words

  • 19 betide — be·tide || bɪ taɪd v. happen, occur …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 20 betide — verb literary happen; befall. Origin ME: from be + obs. tide befall , from OE tīdan happen , from tīd (see tide) …

    English new terms dictionary