be+in+the+ascendant

  • 1 Lord of the ascendant — Ascendant As*cend ant, n. [F. ascendant, L. ascendens; p. pr. of ascendere.] 1. Ascent; height; elevation. [R.] [1913 Webster] Sciences that were then in their highest ascendant. Temple. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astrol.) The horoscope, or that degree… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 be in the ascendant — formal phrase to have or gain power or influence over another person, group etc The Left is now in the ascendant. Thesaurus: to be in chargesynonym Main entry: ascendant …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 3 be in the ascendant — formal to have or gain power or influence over another person, group etc The Left is now in the ascendant …

    English dictionary

  • 4 be in the ascendant — index prevail (triumph) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 house of the ascendant — Etymology: Middle English hous of the ascendent : the first mundane house …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6 lord of the ascendant — a planet whose house is rising in the east …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 7 be in the ascendant — Have superior influence, have commanding influence …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 8 To be in the ascendant — Ascendant As*cend ant, n. [F. ascendant, L. ascendens; p. pr. of ascendere.] 1. Ascent; height; elevation. [R.] [1913 Webster] Sciences that were then in their highest ascendant. Temple. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astrol.) The horoscope, or that degree… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9 in the ascendant — Increasing in influence, prosperity, etc • • • Main Entry: ↑ascend * * * rising in power or influence the reformers are in the ascendant * * * in the ascendant formal : becoming more powerful : gaining more power The President s party is no… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 10 in the ascendant — ► in the ascendant rising in power or influence. Main Entry: ↑ascendant …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 in the ascendant — rising in power or influence. → ascendant …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 12 Ascendant — The ascendant ( sign and degree that was ascending on the eastern horizon at the specific time and location of an event. According to astrological theory, celestial phenomena reflect or determine human activity on the principle of as above so… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 Ascendant — As*cend ant, n. [F. ascendant, L. ascendens; p. pr. of ascendere.] 1. Ascent; height; elevation. [R.] [1913 Webster] Sciences that were then in their highest ascendant. Temple. [1913 Webster] 2. (Astrol.) The horoscope, or that degree of the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 ascendant — ► ADJECTIVE 1) holding a position of increasing status or influence. 2) Astrology (of a planet, zodiacal degree, or sign) on or close to the intersection of the ecliptic with the eastern horizon. ► NOUN Astrology ▪ the ascendant point. ● in the… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 15 Ascendant — As*cend ant, Ascendent As*cend ent, a. 1. Rising toward the zenith; above the horizon. [1913 Webster] The constellation . . . about that time ascendant. Browne. [1913 Webster] 2. Rising; ascending. Ruskin. [1913 Webster] 3. Superior; surpassing;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 ascendant — [ə sen′dənt] adj. [OFr < L ascendens, prp. of ascendere, ASCEND] 1. rising; ascending 2. in control; dominant; superior 3. [often A ] Astrol. designating or of the ASCENDANT (n. 3); rising 4. Bot. ASCENDIN …

    English World dictionary

  • 17 ascendant — late 14c., ascendent, astrological use is earliest, from M.Fr. ascendant (n., adj.) and directly from L. ascendentem (nom. ascendans), prp. of ascendere to mount, ascend, go up (see ASCEND (Cf. ascend)). Sense moving upward, rising is recorded… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 18 The Economist editorial stance — The Economist was first published in September 1843 by James Wilson to take part in a severe contest between intelligence, which presses forward, and an unworthy, timid ignorance obstructing our progress. This phrase is quoted on its contents… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 The Rough Wooing — was a term coined by Sir Walter Scott and H. E. Marshall to describe the Anglo Scottish war pursued intermittently from 1544 to 1551. It followed from the failure of the Scots to honour the terms of the 1543 Treaty of Greenwich, by which the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20 The Acacians —     The Acacians     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Acacians     Known also as the HOMOEANS, an Arian ( see Arianism ) sect which first emerged into distinctness as an ecclesiastical party some time before the convocation of the joint Synods of… …

    Catholic encyclopedia