attendant+circumstance

  • 1 Attendant circumstance — Criminal law Part o …

    Wikipedia

  • 2 Circumstance — or circumstances can refer to: Rhetoric Circumstances (rhetoric) Legal terms Aggravating circumstance Attendant circumstance Exigent circumstance Extenuating circumstances Literature Circumstance (short story) Films Circumstance (film) Others… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 attendant — I. a. Accompanying, attending, concomitant, following, consequent. II. n. 1. Follower, satellite, companion, fellow, associate, escort, attender. 2. Attender, frequenter, person present. 3. Servant, vassal, servitor, dependant, retainer, squire,… …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 4 circumstance — cir cum*stance (s[ e]r k[u^]m*st[a^]ns), n. [L. circumstantia, fr. circumstans, antis, p. pr. of circumstare to stand around; circum + stare to stand. See {Stand}.] 1. That which attends, or relates to, or in some way affects, a fact or event; an …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 attendant — [ə ten′dənt] adj. 1. attending or serving [an attendant nurse] 2. being present 3. accompanying as a circumstance or result [attendant difficulties] n. 1. a person who attends or serves [an attendant at the zoo, a queen s attendants] 2 …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 circumstance — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French, from Latin circumstantia, from circumstant , circumstans, present participle of circumstare to stand around, from circum + stare to stand more at stand Date: 13th century 1. a. a condition, fact …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 circumstance — 1. noun a) That which attends, or relates to, or in some way affects, a fact or event; an attendant thing or state of things. Then another circumstance happened, which made a lasting impression on my memory, though I was but a small child. b) An… …

    Wiktionary

  • 8 circumstance — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Concomitant condition Nouns 1. circumstance, situation, condition, case, phase, position, posture, attitude, place, environment; footing, standing, status, state; occasion, eventuality, juncture,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 9 Not a circumstance — circumstance cir cum*stance (s[ e]r k[u^]m*st[a^]ns), n. [L. circumstantia, fr. circumstans, antis, p. pr. of circumstare to stand around; circum + stare to stand. See {Stand}.] 1. That which attends, or relates to, or in some way affects, a fact …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 Mens rea — Criminal law Part of …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 Aggravation (legal concept) — Aggravation, in law, is any circumstance attending the commission of a crime or tort which increases its guilt or enormity or adds to its injurious consequences, but which is above and beyond the essential constituents of the crime or tort itself …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 Extenuating circumstances — In law, extenuating circumstances in criminal cases are unusual or extreme facts leading up to or attending the commission of the offense which, though an offense has been committed without legal justification or excuse, mitigate or reduce its… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 Attendment — At*tend ment, n. [Cf. OF. atendement.] An attendant circumstance. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The uncomfortable attendments of hell. Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 ablative absolute — noun Date: circa 1828 a construction in Latin in which a noun or pronoun and its adjunct both in the ablative case form together an adverbial phrase expressing generally the time, cause, or an attendant circumstance of an action …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 15 appendant — adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French apendaunt, present participle of apendre to belong, be subject, from Medieval Latin appendēre to be attached, belong to, from Latin, to be pending, from ad + pendēre to hang (intransitive… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 Actus reus — sometimes called the external element or the objective element of a crime, is the Latin term for the guilty act which, when proved beyond a reasonable doubt in combination with the mens rea , guilty mind , produces criminal liability in the comm …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 Tax avoidance and tax evasion — Tax avoidance is the legal utilization of the tax regime to one s own advantage, in order to reduce the amount of tax that is payable by means that are within the law. By contrast tax evasion is the general term for efforts to not pay taxes by… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 Baumes law — The Baumes law was a statute passed by New York State in 1926. DescriptionWritten by and named after Senator Caleb H. Baumes, the chairman of the New York State Crime Commission, the law called for the automatic life imprisonment of any criminal… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19 adverb — adverbless, adj. /ad verrb/, n. Gram. any member of a class of words that in many languages are distinguished in form, as partly in English by the ending ly, or by functioning as modifiers of verbs or clauses, and in some languages, as Latin and… …

    Universalium

  • 20 element — el·e·ment n: one of the constituent parts (as a particular act, a mental state, or an attendant circumstance) of a crime as defined by statute that the prosecution must prove to win a conviction Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam… …

    Law dictionary