amend

  • 1 amend — vt 1: to change or modify for the better 2: to alter esp. in the wording; esp: to alter formally by modification, deletion, or addition amend ed the statute amend the complaint to cure the defect amend·able adj …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 Amend — A*mend , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Amended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Amending}.] [F. amender, L. emendare; e (ex) + mendum, menda, fault, akin to Skr. minda personal defect. Cf. {Emend}, {Mend}.] To change or modify in any way for the better; as, (a) by… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 amend — a‧mend [əˈmend] verb [transitive] to make small changes to a law or a document, for example to improve it, to make it more accurate, or to take account of new conditions: • a controversial plan to amend the Constitution amendment noun [countable …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4 Amend — as a verb means to change or modify something, as in: *Constitutional amendment *Amend (motion), a motion to modify a pending main motion in parliamentary procedure *Amend something previously adopted, a motion to modify a previously adopted… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 Amend — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Bill Amend (* 1962), US amerikanischer Comiczeichner Christoph Amend (* 1974), deutscher Journalist (Leiter Zeitmagazin) Erwin Amend (1919 1997), deutscher Komponist und Konzertmeister Rolf Dieter Amend (* …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 6 amend — amend; amend·a·ble; amend·a·to·ry; amend·ment; re·amend; …

    English syllables

  • 7 amend — amend, emend 1. Amend is the more common word, used of making adjustments to a document or formal proposal (such as a parliamentary act), and also as a special word for ‘to change’ or ‘to alter’ in the context of personal behaviour. Its… …

    Modern English usage

  • 8 amend — ► VERB ▪ make minor improvements to (a document, proposal, etc.). DERIVATIVES amendable adjective. USAGE On the difference between amend and emend, see the note at EMEND(Cf. ↑emendation). ORIGIN L …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 Amend — A*mend ([.a]*m[e^]nd ), v. i. To grow better by rectifying something wrong in manners or morals; to improve. My fortune . . . amends. Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 amend — (v.) early 13c., to free from faults, rectify, from O.Fr. amender (12c.), from L. emendare to correct, free from fault, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + menda fault, blemish, from PIE *mend physical defect, fault (Cf. Skt. minda physical blemish …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 11 amend — reform, *correct, rectify, revise, emend, remedy, redress Analogous words: *improve, better, ameliorate: *mend, repair: elevate, raise, *lift Antonyms: debase: impair Contrasted words: corrupt, vitiate, deprave, debauch, pervert (see DEBASE): * …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 12 amend — [v] improve, correct alter, ameliorate, better, change, elevate, enhance, fix, help, lift, make up for, mend, modify, pay one’s dues*, raise, rectify, reform, remedy, repair, revise, right, square*; concepts 126,244 Ant. blemish, corrupt, debase …

    New thesaurus

  • 13 amend — [ə mend′] vt. [ME amenden < OFr amender < L emendare, to correct: see EMEND] 1. to make better; improve 2. to remove the faults of; correct; emend 3. to change or revise (a legislative bill, law, constitution, etc.) vi. to improve one s… …

    English World dictionary

  • 14 amend — amendable, adj. amender, n. /euh mend /, v.t. 1. to alter, modify, rephrase, or add to or subtract from (a motion, bill, constitution, etc.) by formal procedure: Congress may amend the proposed tax bill. 2. to change for the better; improve: to… …

    Universalium

  • 15 amend — a•mend [[t]əˈmɛnd[/t]] v. t. 1) gov to modify, rephrase, or add to or subtract from (a bill, constitution, etc.) by formal procedure: Congress may amend the proposed tax bill[/ex] 2) to change for the better; improve 3) to remove or correct… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 16 amend — 01. We have decided to [amend] our policy in order to include new employees in the Christmas bonus program. 02. I won t support the policy unless it is [amended]. 03. The university tennis club has [amended] its rules to allow players to wear… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 17 amend — verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French amender, modification of Latin emendare, from e, ex out + menda fault; akin to Latin mendax lying, mendicus beggar, and perhaps to Sanskrit mindā physical defect Date: 13th century transitive verb …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 amend — [[t]əme̱nd[/t]] amends, amending, amended 1) VERB If you amend something that has been written such as a law, or something that is said, you change it in order to improve it or make it more accurate. [V n] Kaunda agreed to amend the constitution… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 amend */*/ — UK [əˈmend] / US verb [transitive] Word forms amend : present tense I/you/we/they amend he/she/it amends present participle amending past tense amended past participle amended to make changes to a document, law, agreement etc, especially in order …

    English dictionary

  • 20 amend — verb /əˈmɛnd/ a) To make better. But Paridell complaynd, that his late fight / With Britomart, so sore did him offend, / That ryde he could not, till his hurts he did amend. b) To become better. he gave her a vomit, and conveyed a serpent, such… …

    Wiktionary