act+of+stinging

  • 1 stinging — sting·ing || stɪŋɪŋ adj. producing or causing a sting; able to cause a sting; hurtful, cutting, biting stɪŋ n. act of stinging; sharp pain or wound caused a stinger; sharp organ or part (Botany, Zoology); covert operation executed by… …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 2 Stinging nettle — Urtica dioica subsp. dioica Scientific classification Kingdom: Plantae …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 stinging — the act of introducing venom into the flesh of a victim by means of a venom apparatus; envenomation …

    Dictionary of ichthyology

  • 4 Military Commissions Act of 2006 — For other uses, see Military Commissions Act (disambiguation). Military Commissions Act of 2006 Full title Military Commissions Act of 2006 Citations Public Law …

    Wikipedia

  • 5 History of the USA PATRIOT Act — The history of the USA PATRIOT Act involved many parties who opposed and supported the legislation, which was proposed, enacted and signed into law a month and a half after the September 11 terrorist attacks of New York City in 2001. The USA… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 sting — stingingly, adv. stingless, adj. /sting/, v., stung or (Obs.) stang; stung; stinging; n. v.t. 1. to prick or wound with a sharp pointed, often venom bearing organ. 2. to affect painfully or irritatingly as a result of contact, as certain plants… …

    Universalium

  • 7 sting — [stiŋ] vt. stung, stinging [ME stingen < OE stingan, akin to ON stinga < IE base * stegh , to pierce, sharp > STAG] 1. to prick or wound with a sting: said of plants and insects 2. to cause sharp, sudden, smarting pain to, by or as by… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 sting´ing|ly — sting «stihng», verb, stung or (Archaic) stang, sting|ing, noun. –v.t. 1. to pierce or wound with a sharp pointed organ (often) bearing a poisonous fluid: »If a honeybee stings you, remove the stinger. 2 …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 9 sting — I. verb (stung; stinging) Etymology: Middle English, from Old English stingan; akin to Old Norse stinga to sting and probably to Greek stachys spike of grain, stochos target, aim Date: before 12th century transitive verb 1. to prick painfully: as …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 10 sting — 1. Sharp momentary pain, most commonly produced by the puncture of the skin by many species of arthropods, including hexapods, myriapods, and arachnids; can also be produced by jellyfish, sea urchins, sponges, mollusks, and several species of… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 11 Doratifera vulnerans — Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 Murex erinaceus — Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 Sting — Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting of a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 Sting moth — Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 Sting ray — Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 Sting winkle — Sting Sting, n. [AS. sting a sting. See {Sting}, v. t.] 1. (Zo[ o]l.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 sting — [c]/stɪŋ / (say sting) verb (stung, stinging) –verb (t) 1. to prick or wound with some sharp pointed, often venom bearing, organ, with which certain animals are equipped: a bee stung me. 2. to affect painfully or irritatingly, especially as a… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 18 sting — (v.) O.E. stingan to prick with a small point (of weapons, insects, plants, etc.), from P.Gmc. *stenganan (Cf. O.N. stinga, O.H.G. stungen to prick, Goth. us stagg to prick out, O.H.G. stanga, Ger. stange pole, perch, Ger. stengel stalk, stem ),… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 19 beekeeping — /bee kee ping/, n. the rearing and breeding of honeybees; apiculture. [1830 40; BEE1 + KEEPING] * * * or apiculture Care and manipulation of honeybees to enable them to produce and store more honey than they need so that the excess can be… …

    Universalium

  • 20 sting — [OE] Sting comes from a prehistoric Germanic base *stengg , which also produced Swedish stinga and Danish stinge. This denoted ‘pierce with something sharp’ (‘He with a spear stung the proud Viking’, Battle of Maldon 993), a meaning which was not …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins