acquirements

  • 1acquirements — index education Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2acquirements — ac quire·ment || mÉ™nt n. something acquired or attained …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 3Acquirement — Ac*quire ment ( ment), n. The act of acquiring, or that which is acquired; attainment. Rules for the acquirement of a taste. Addison. [1913 Webster] His acquirements by industry were . . . enriched and enlarged by many excellent endowments of… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4James Mark Baldwin — (Columbia, South Carolina, 1861–1934) was an American philosopher and psychologist who was educated at Princeton under the supervision of Scottish philosopher James McCosh and who was one of the founders of the Department of Psychology at the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 5Disciples of Confucius — Sima Qian has Confucius saying: The disciples who received my instructions, and could themselves comprehend them, were seventy seven individuals. They were all scholars of extraordinary ability. The common saying is, that the disciples of the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6Knowledge — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Knowledge >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 knowledge knowledge Sgm: N 1 cognizance cognizance cognition cognoscence| Sgm: N 1 acquaintance acquaintance experience ken privity insight familiarity …

    English dictionary for students

  • 7Accomplish — Ac*com plish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accomplished}, p. pr. & vb. n. {Accomplishing}.] [OE. acomplissen, OF. accomplir, F. accomplir; L. ad + complere to fill up, complete. See {Complete}, {Finish}.] 1. To complete, as time or distance. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8Accomplished — Accomplish Ac*com plish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accomplished}, p. pr. & vb. n. {Accomplishing}.] [OE. acomplissen, OF. accomplir, F. accomplir; L. ad + complere to fill up, complete. See {Complete}, {Finish}.] 1. To complete, as time or distance.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9Accomplished — Ac*com plished, a. 1. Completed; effected; established; as, an accomplished fact. [1913 Webster] 2. Complete in acquirements as the result usually of training; commonly in a good sense; as, an accomplished scholar, an accomplished villain. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10Accomplishing — Accomplish Ac*com plish, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Accomplished}, p. pr. & vb. n. {Accomplishing}.] [OE. acomplissen, OF. accomplir, F. accomplir; L. ad + complere to fill up, complete. See {Complete}, {Finish}.] 1. To complete, as time or distance.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11arithmetical mean — Mean Mean, n. 1. That which is mean, or intermediate, between two extremes of place, time, or number; the middle point or place; middle rate or degree; mediocrity; medium; absence of extremes or excess; moderation; measure. [1913 Webster] But to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12Attainment — At*tain ment, n. 1. The act of attaining; the act of arriving at or reaching; hence, the act of obtaining by efforts. [1913 Webster] The attainment of every desired object. Sir W. Jones. [1913 Webster] 2. That which is attained to, or obtained by …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13By all means — Mean Mean, n. 1. That which is mean, or intermediate, between two extremes of place, time, or number; the middle point or place; middle rate or degree; mediocrity; medium; absence of extremes or excess; moderation; measure. [1913 Webster] But to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14By any means — Mean Mean, n. 1. That which is mean, or intermediate, between two extremes of place, time, or number; the middle point or place; middle rate or degree; mediocrity; medium; absence of extremes or excess; moderation; measure. [1913 Webster] But to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15By no manner of means — Mean Mean, n. 1. That which is mean, or intermediate, between two extremes of place, time, or number; the middle point or place; middle rate or degree; mediocrity; medium; absence of extremes or excess; moderation; measure. [1913 Webster] But to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16By no means — Mean Mean, n. 1. That which is mean, or intermediate, between two extremes of place, time, or number; the middle point or place; middle rate or degree; mediocrity; medium; absence of extremes or excess; moderation; measure. [1913 Webster] But to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17Excel — Ex*cel , v. i. To surpass others in good qualities, laudable actions, or acquirements; to be distinguished by superiority; as, to excel in mathematics, or classics. [1913 Webster] Unstable as water, thou shalt not excel. Gen. xlix. 4. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18geometrical mean — Mean Mean, n. 1. That which is mean, or intermediate, between two extremes of place, time, or number; the middle point or place; middle rate or degree; mediocrity; medium; absence of extremes or excess; moderation; measure. [1913 Webster] But to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19Mean — Mean, n. 1. That which is mean, or intermediate, between two extremes of place, time, or number; the middle point or place; middle rate or degree; mediocrity; medium; absence of extremes or excess; moderation; measure. [1913 Webster] But to speak …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20Proficient — Pro*fi cient, a. Well advanced in any branch of knowledge or skill; possessed of considerable acquirements; well skilled; versed; adept, [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English