Withdraw+from+circulation

  • 1 withdraw from — phr verb Withdraw from is used with these nouns as the object: ↑account, ↑circulation, ↑competition, ↑race, ↑sponsorship …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 2 circulation — n. distribution 1) to put into circulation (to put more money into circulation) 2) to withdraw from circulation (to withdraw old banknotes from circulation) 3) enormous, large, wide; general; limited, small; national, nationwide circulation (this …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 3 circulation — cir‧cu‧la‧tion [ˌsɜːkjˈleɪʆn ǁ ˌsɜːr ] noun 1. [uncountable] the exchange of money within an economy: • It was a bold anti inflation plan, including a squeeze on the circulation of money. 2. [uncountable] ECONOMICS if money is in circulation,… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4 withdraw — with•draw [[t]wɪðˈdrɔ, wɪθ [/t]] v. drew, drawn, draw•ing 1) to draw back, away, or aside; take or pull back: to withdraw one s support; She withdrew her hand[/ex] 2) to take out or away, as from a place or from consideration or circulation;… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 5 circulation — cir|cu|la|tion [ˌsə:kjuˈleıʃən US ˌsə:r ] n 1.) [singular, U] the movement of blood around your body ▪ Exercise improves the circulation. good/bad circulation ▪ Doctors had to remove her leg because of bad circulation. 2.) [U] the exchange of… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 6 circulation — noun 1 movement of blood around the body ADJECTIVE ▪ good ▪ bad, poor ▪ blood VERB + CIRCULATION ▪ have …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 7 withdraw — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. remove, separate, subduct; retire, retreat, disengage, draw off; abstract, subtract; recall, rescind, recant; resign, relinquish; abdicate, decamp, depart; shrink, recoil, drop out, back out. See… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 8 retire — retirer, n. /ri tuyeur /, v., retired, retiring, n. v.i. 1. to withdraw, or go away or apart, to a place of privacy, shelter, or seclusion: He retired to his study. 2. to go to bed: He retired at midnight. 3. to withdraw from office, business, or …

    Universalium

  • 9 retire — re•tire [[t]rɪˈtaɪər[/t]] v. tired, tir•ing 1) to withdraw or go away to a place of privacy, shelter, or seclusion: She retired to her study[/ex] 2) to go to bed 3) to give up or withdraw from an office, occupation, or career, usu. because of age …

    From formal English to slang

  • 10 retire — verb (retired; retiring) Etymology: Middle French retirer, from re + tirer to draw Date: 1533 intransitive verb 1. to withdraw from action or danger ; retreat 2. to withdraw especially for privacy < retired to her room > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 11 retire — re·tire vb re·tired, re·tir·ing vi: to withdraw from an action the jury retired for deliberations vt: to withdraw from circulation or from the market retire a loan retire stock Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law …

    Law dictionary

  • 12 retire — [c]/rəˈtaɪə / (say ruh tuyuh) verb (retired, retiring) –verb (i) 1. to withdraw, or go away or apart, to a place of abode, shelter, or seclusion. 2. to go to bed. 3. to withdraw from office, business, or active life: to retire at the age of sixty …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 13 Censorship —    During the period of partition, films in the Polish territories were censored according to the laws of the occupying powers. After regaining independence in 1918, the government was in favor of an open market regulated by tariffs and… …

    Guide to cinema

  • 14 Censorship —    Film censorship regulations were first introduced in Italy in 1913 by a law that established the requirement for all films to be furnished with an official written release (nulla osta) from the Ministry for the Interior, granted on the basis… …

    Historical dictionary of Italian cinema

  • 15 re|tir´er — re|tire «rih TYR», verb, tired, tir|ing. –v.i. 1. to give up an office or occupation, especially because of approaching old age: »Our teachers retire at 65. You and your wife…look forward to the day when you can retire (Newsweek). 2. to go away,… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 16 re|tire — «rih TYR», verb, tired, tir|ing. –v.i. 1. to give up an office or occupation, especially because of approaching old age: »Our teachers retire at 65. You and your wife…look forward to the day when you can retire (Newsweek). 2. to go away,… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 17 retire — 1. noun /ɹəˈtaɪ.ə(ɹ)/ a) The act of retiring, or the state of being retired; also, a place to which one retires. His retire is by a lake. b) A call sounded on a bugle, announcing to skirmishers that they are to retire, or fall back …

    Wiktionary

  • 18 Retire — Re*tire , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Retired}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Retiring}.] [F. retirer; pref. re re + tirer to draw. See {Tirade}.] 1. To withdraw; to take away; sometimes used reflexively. [1913 Webster] He . . . retired himself, his wife, and… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 Retired — Retire Re*tire , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Retired}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Retiring}.] [F. retirer; pref. re re + tirer to draw. See {Tirade}.] 1. To withdraw; to take away; sometimes used reflexively. [1913 Webster] He . . . retired himself, his wife, and …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Retiring — Retire Re*tire , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Retired}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Retiring}.] [F. retirer; pref. re re + tirer to draw. See {Tirade}.] 1. To withdraw; to take away; sometimes used reflexively. [1913 Webster] He . . . retired himself, his wife, and …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English