Very+much

  • 1 very much so — spoken phrase used for emphasizing your agreement with what someone has said ‘Does it bother you that there are no other women working in your office?’ ‘Very much so.’ Thesaurus: ways of agreeing with someonesynonym Main entry: very * * * very… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 2 very much — adverb to a very great degree or extent (Freq. 14) I feel a lot better we enjoyed ourselves very much she was very much interested this would help a great deal • Syn: ↑a lot, ↑lots, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 3 very much so — to a great degree. My father did inspire me, very much so. “So crime is a big concern where you live?” “Very much so.” …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 4 very much so — spoken used for emphasizing your agreement with what someone has said Does it bother you that there are no other women working in your office? Very much so …

    English dictionary

  • 5 very much — adverb Extremely …

    Wiktionary

  • 6 very much — extremely; immensely, a lot …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 7 very much — swiðe, swyðe …

    English to the Old English

  • 8 very much like — adverb in a similar way (Freq. 1) • Syn: ↑much as …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 9 very much alive — extremely active …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 10 Thank You Very Much — Infobox Single Name = Thank You Very Much Artist = Kevin Ayers Album = Still Life with Guitar B side = ‘There Goes Johnny’ ‘Don’t Blame Them’ Released = 1992 Format =CD 7 45 rpm Genre = Rock Label = FNAC Producer = Dave Vatch and Kevin Ayers Misc …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 be very much something — phrase used for emphasizing that a description of someone or something is very accurate or true We’re very much a family, and we stick together. Palmer is very much the man in charge of the team. Fox hunting had always been very much the sport of …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 12 be very much something — used for emphasizing that a description of someone or something is very accurate or true We re very much a family, and we stick together. Palmer is very much the man in charge of the team. Fox hunting had always been very much the sport of the… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 I Like You, I Like You Very Much — Infobox Film name = I Like You, I Like You Very Much image size = caption = DVD cover director = Hiroyuki Oki producer = Akihiro Suzuki writer = Hiroyuki Oki narrator = starring = music = cinematography = Hiroyuki Oki editing = Hiroyuki Oki… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 thank you very much — phr. a (sometimes sarcastic) tag added to a statement for emphasis. (Often used when there is really nothing to thank anyone for.) □ I will manage somehow to find my own way out, thank you very much. □ We are probably the only people in town who… …

    Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • 15 I, Yi, Yi, Yi, Yi (I Like You Very Much) — is a 1941 song. It was written for the 1941 film That Night in Rio and was popularized by Carmen Miranda. The lyrics were written by Mack Gordon and the music by Harry Warren.The song also makes an appearance in the series finale of the 1960s… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 I want you very much to — I would like you to …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 17 thank you very much — many thanks to you, i thank you …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 18 much — [ mʌtʃ ] (comparative more [ mɔr ] ; superlative most [ moust ] ) function word, quantifier *** Much can be used in the following ways: as a determiner (followed by an uncountable noun): There isn t much time left. How much money do you have? as… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 19 much — For the complementary uses of much and very, see very. very, much 1. The uses of very and much as intensifying adverbs are for the most part complementary. Very qualifies adjectives and adverbs (very large / very slowly), whereas much qualifies… …

    Modern English usage

  • 20 very — very, much 1. The uses of very and much as intensifying adverbs are for the most part complementary. Very qualifies adjectives and adverbs (very large / very slowly), whereas much qualifies past participles that are used as adjectives (a much… …

    Modern English usage