The+Stoic+philosophy

  • 1 Stoics and Stoic Philosophy — • The Stoic School was founded in 322 B.C. by Zeno of Cittium and existed until the closing of the Athenian schools (A.D. 429) Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Stoics and Stoic Philosophy     Stoics amd Stoic P …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 2 Diodotus the Stoic — Diodotus (Greek: Διόδοτος; fl. 1st century BC) was a Stoic philosopher, and was a friend of Cicero. He lived for most of his life in Rome in Cicero s house, where he instructed Cicero in Stoic philosophy and especially Logic.[1] Although Cicero… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 The Blessed Trinity —     The Blessed Trinity     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Blessed Trinity     This article is divided as follows:          I. Dogma of the Trinity;     II. Proof of the Doctrine from Scripture;     III. Proof of the Doctrine from Tradition;… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 4 the porch — The Stoic philosophy, philosophy of Zeno, stoicism …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 5 Philosophy — • Detailed article on the history of the love of wisdom Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Philosophy     Philosophy     † …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 6 Philosophy (The) of the Italian Renaissance — The philosophy of the Italian Renaissance Jill Kraye TWO CULTURES: SCHOLASTICISM AND HUMANISM IN THE EARLY RENAISSANCE Two movements exerted a profound influence on the philosophy of the Italian Renaissance: scholasticism and humanism, both of… …

    History of philosophy

  • 7 Philosophy of language — is the reasoned inquiry into the nature, origins, and usage of language. As a topic, the philosophy of language for Analytic Philosophers is concerned with four central problems: the nature of meaning, language use, language cognition, and the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 8 The Republic (Zeno) — The Republic of Zeno was a work written by Zeno of Citium, the founder of Stoic philosophy at the beginning of the 3rd century BC. Although it has not survived, it was his most famous work, and various quotes and paraphrases were preserved by… …

    Wikipedia

  • 9 The Logos —     The Logos     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Logos     The word Logos is the term by which Christian theology in the Greek language designates the Word of God, or Second Person of the Blessed Trinity. Before St. John had consecrated this term… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 10 The Highest Good —     The Highest Good     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Highest Good      We always act with a view to some good. The good is the object which all pursue, and for the sake of which they always act , says Plato (Republic, I, vi). His disciple… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 11 The Renaissance —     The Renaissance     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► The Renaissance     The Renaissance may be considered in a general or a particular sense, as     (1) the achievements of what is termed the modern spirit in opposition to the spirit which… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 12 Stoic Passions — refers to various forms of emotional suffering in Stoicism, a school of Hellenistic philosophy.Primary PassionsThe Stoics named four primary passions. In On Passions , Andronicus reported the Stoic definitions of these passions (trans. Long… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 The Roman Actor — is a Caroline era stage play, a tragedy written by Philip Massinger; it was first performed in 1626, and first published in 1629. A number of critics have agreed with its author, and judged it one of Massinger s best plays. [Logan and Smith, pp.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 philosophy, Western — Introduction       history of Western philosophy from its development among the ancient Greeks to the present.       This article has three basic purposes: (1) to provide an overview of the history of philosophy in the West, (2) to relate… …

    Universalium

  • 15 PHILOSOPHY, JEWISH — This article is arranged according to the following outline: WHAT IS JEWISH PHILOSOPHY? recent histories of jewish philosophy biblical and rabbinic antecedents bible rabbinic literature hellenistic jewish philosophy philo of alexandria biblical… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 16 Stoic — /stoh ik/, adj. 1. of or pertaining to the school of philosophy founded by Zeno, who taught that people should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity. 2. (l.c.) stoical. n. 3. a member …

    Universalium

  • 17 Stoic — Sto•ic [[t]ˈstoʊ ɪk[/t]] adj. 1) pho of or pertaining to the school of philosophy founded by Zeno, who taught that people should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity 2) (l.c.)… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 18 Stoic — /ˈstoʊɪk/ (say stohik) adjective 1. of or relating to the school of philosophy founded by Zeno of Citium, who taught that people should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity. –noun 2 …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 19 Stoic — Sto·ic || stəʊɪk n. member of the stoic school of philosophy (philosophy maintaining that a wise man should be free from passion) …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 20 stoic — stoic, stoical As an adjective, stoic is normally used attributively (i.e. before a noun, as in stoic virtues and stoic indifference), and preserves a more direct reference to the philosophy of the ancient Stoics from whom the word is derived. In …

    Modern English usage