Reverberate

  • 1 Reverberate — Re*ver ber*ate, a. [L. reverberatus, p. p. of reverberare to strike back, repel; pref. re re + verberare to lash, whip, beat, fr. verber a lash, whip, rod.] 1. Reverberant. [Obs.] The reverberate hills. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. Driven back, as… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Reverberate — Re*ver ber*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reverberated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Reverberating}.] 1. To return or send back; to repel or drive back; to echo, as sound; to reflect, as light, as light or heat. [1913 Webster] Who, like an arch, reverberates The …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 Reverberate — Re*ver ber*ate, v. i. 1. To resound; to echo. [1913 Webster] 2. To be driven back; to be reflected or repelled, as rays of light; to be echoed, as sound. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 reverberate — (v.) 1570s, from L. reverberatus, pp. of reverberare (see REVERBERATION (Cf. reverberation)). Related: Reverberated; reverberating …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 5 reverberate — repercuss, *rebound, recoil, resile Analogous words: *return, revert, recur …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 6 reverberate — [v] vibrate in sound echo, react, rebound, recoil, redound, reecho, resound, ring; concept 65 Ant. quieten …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 reverberate — ► VERB 1) (of a loud noise) be repeated as an echo. 2) have continuing serious effects. DERIVATIVES reverberant adjective reverberation noun reverberative adjective reverberator noun reverberatory adjective …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 reverberate — [ri vʉr′bə rāt΄; ] for adj. [, ri vʉr′bə rit] vt. reverberated, reverberating [< L reverberatus, pp. of reverberare, to beat back, repel < re , again + verberare, to beat < verber, a lash, whip, akin to VERBENA] 1. to cause (a sound) to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 reverberate — re|ver|be|rate [rıˈvə:bəreıt US ə:r ] v [Date: 1400 1500; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of reverberare [i] to hit back, repel , from verberare to hit ] 1.) if a loud sound reverberates, it is heard many times as it is sent back from… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 reverberate — UK [rɪˈvɜː(r)bəreɪt] / US [rɪˈvɜrbəˌreɪt] verb [intransitive] Word forms reverberate : present tense I/you/we/they reverberate he/she/it reverberates present participle reverberating past tense reverberated past participle reverberated 1) if a… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 reverberate — v. (D; intr.) to reverberate through (the cheers reverberated through the arena) * * * [rɪ vɜːb(ə)reɪt] (D; intr.) to reverberate through (the cheers reverberated through the arena) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 12 reverberate — re|ver|ber|ate [ rı vɜrbə,reıt ] verb intransitive 1. ) if a sound reverberates it is repeated many times as it hits two opposite surfaces: A loud knocking on the door suddenly reverberated around the apartment. 2. ) if something such as a room… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 reverberate — [[t]rɪvɜ͟ː(r)bəreɪt[/t]] reverberates, reverberating, reverberated 1) VERB When a loud sound reverberates through a place, it echoes through it. [V prep] Day in and day out, the flat crack of the tank guns reverberates through the little Bavarian …

    English dictionary

  • 14 reverberate — verb Reverberate is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑echo, ↑voice, ↑word …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 15 reverberate — [16] Latin verbera meant ‘whips, rods’ (it was related to Greek rhábdos ‘stick’). From it was derived the verb verberāre ‘whip, beat’, which with the addition of the prefix re ‘back’ produced reverberāre ‘beat back’. When this first arrived in… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 16 reverberate — [c]/rəˈvɜbəreɪt / (say ruh verbuhrayt) verb (reverberated, reverberating) –verb (i) 1. to re echo or resound. 2. Physics to be reflected many times, as soundwaves from the walls, etc., of a confined space. 3. to rebound or recoil. 4. to be… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 17 reverberate — [16] Latin verbera meant ‘whips, rods’ (it was related to Greek rhábdos ‘stick’). From it was derived the verb verberāre ‘whip, beat’, which with the addition of the prefix re ‘back’ produced reverberāre ‘beat back’. When this first arrived in… …

    Word origins

  • 18 reverberate — I. verb ( ated; ating) Etymology: Latin reverberatus, past participle of reverberare, from re + verberare to lash, from verber rod more at vervain Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. reflect 2. repel …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 19 reverberate — reverberative /ri verr beuh ray tiv, beuhr euh /, adj. reverberator, n. v. /ri verr beuh rayt /; adj. /ri verr beuhr it/, v., reverberated, reverberating, adj. v.i. 1. to reecho or resound: Her singing reverberated through the house. 2. Physics.… …

    Universalium

  • 20 reverberate — verb /ɹəˈvɜː(ɹ).bɜː(ɹ).eɪt/ a) to ring with many echos b) to have a lasting effect See Also: reverberation …

    Wiktionary