Recite+a+speech

  • 1recite — [ri sīt′] vt. recited, reciting [ME reciten < OFr reciter < L recitare: see RE & CITE] 1. to repeat or say aloud from or as from memory, esp. in a formal way; give a recitation on (a lesson) in class or of (a poem, speech, etc.) before an… …

    English World dictionary

  • 2recite — I verb address, articulate, chant, communicate, declaim, delineate, deliver, detail, dicere, discourse, divulge, dramatize, enact, enumerare, enumerate, exponere, express, give a verbal account, give expression, hold forth, interpret, lecture,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 3speech — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) Oral communication Nouns 1. speech, talk, faculty of speech; locution, parlance, expression, vernacular, oral communication, word of mouth, parole, palaver, prattle; effusion, discourse; soliloquy;… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 4Speech — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Speech >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 speech speech faculty of speech Sgm: N 1 locution locution talk parlance verbal intercourse prolation oral communication word of mouth parole palaver prattle …

    English dictionary for students

  • 5recite — [15] Recite came, probably via Old French reciter, from Latin recitāre ‘read out’. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix re ‘back, again’ and citāre ‘call, summon’ (source also of English cite, excite, incite, etc). Recitative ‘speech… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 6recite — [15] Recite came, probably via Old French reciter, from Latin recitāre ‘read out’. This was a compound verb formed from the prefix re ‘back, again’ and citāre ‘call, summon’ (source also of English cite, excite, incite, etc). Recitative ‘speech… …

    Word origins

  • 7recite — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. rehearse, relate, repeat, declaim, detail, recapitulate. See speech, description. II (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To repeat formally] Syn. declaim, address, read, render, quote, discourse, hold forth, enact,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 8recite — re·cite || rɪ saɪt v. tell, recount, relate; read; declaim, give a formal speech; count, list, enumerate …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 9recite — v 1. repeat or say from memory or by heart, quote, do a recitation, give a recitation or recital, give or do a reading; repeat, rehearse, review, run through or over; present or do one s number or piece, U.S. Sl. present or do one s bit or thing …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 10Iowa High School Speech Association — The Iowa High School Speech Association (IHSSA) consists of member high schools from four districts in Iowa, and offers three categories of competition: debate, large group, and individual events. At the end of each of the three contests, the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 11make a speech — index converse, declaim, discourse, recite, speak Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 12Phaedrus (dialogue) — The Phaedrus (Greek: Φαίδρος), written by Plato, is a dialogue between Plato s main protagonist, Socrates, and Phaedrus, an interlocutor in several dialogues. The Phaedrus was presumably composed around 370 BC, around the same time as Plato s… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13declaim — [dē klām′, diklām′] vi. [ME declamen < L declamare < de , intens. + clamare, to cry, shout: see CLAMOR] 1. to recite a speech, poem, etc. with studied or artificial eloquence 2. a) to speak in a dramatic, pompous, or blustering way b) to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 14Declaim — De*claim (d[ e]*kl[=a]m ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Declaimed} (d[ e]*kl[=a]md ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Declaiming}.] [L. declamare; de + clamare to cry out: cf. F. d[ e]clamer. See {Claim}.] 1. To speak rhetorically; to make a formal speech or oration;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15Declaimed — Declaim De*claim (d[ e]*kl[=a]m ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Declaimed} (d[ e]*kl[=a]md ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Declaiming}.] [L. declamare; de + clamare to cry out: cf. F. d[ e]clamer. See {Claim}.] 1. To speak rhetorically; to make a formal speech or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16Declaiming — Declaim De*claim (d[ e]*kl[=a]m ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Declaimed} (d[ e]*kl[=a]md ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Declaiming}.] [L. declamare; de + clamare to cry out: cf. F. d[ e]clamer. See {Claim}.] 1. To speak rhetorically; to make a formal speech or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17Charles Macklin — Portrait of Charles Macklin by John Opie, circa 1792 Charles Macklin (26 September 1699 – 11 July 1797), originally Cathal MacLochlainn (or Charles McLaughlin in English), was an actor and dramatist born in Culdaff, a village on the scenic… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18say — verb (says; past and past participle said) 1》 utter words so as to convey information, an opinion, an instruction, etc.     ↘(of a text or symbol) convey information or instructions.     ↘(of a clock or watch) indicate (a time).     ↘(be said) be …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 19declaim — v. n. 1. Harangue, speak (rhetorically), mouth, rant, spout (colloq.). 2. Recite a speech, practise speaking …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 20Judaism — /jooh dee iz euhm, day , deuh /, n. 1. the monotheistic religion of the Jews, having its ethical, ceremonial, and legal foundation in the precepts of the Old Testament and in the teachings and commentaries of the rabbis as found chiefly in the… …

    Universalium