Offend

  • 1Offend — Of*fend, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Offended}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Offending}.] [OF. offendre, L. offendere, offensum; ob (see {Ob }) + fendere (in comp.) to thrust, dash. See {Defend}.] 1. To strike against; to attack; to assail. [Obs.] Sir P. Sidney.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2offend — of‧fend [əˈfend] verb 1. [intransitive] LAW to do something that is a crime: • What can be done to stop criminals offending again? 2. [intransitive, transitive] to make someone angry or upset: • The advertisement was never intended to offend… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 3Offend — Of*fend , v. i. 1. To transgress the moral or divine law; to commit a crime; to stumble; to sin. [1913 Webster] Whosoever shall keep the whole law, and yet offend in one point, he is guilty of all. James ii. 10. [1913 Webster] If it be a sin to… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4offend — offend, outrage, affront, insult mean to cause vexation or resentment or damage to self respect. One offends by displeasing another, by hurting his feelings, or by violating his sense of what is proper or fitting {if the First Amendment means… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 5offend — I (insult) verb abuse, affront, anger, annoy, be discourteous, be impolite, chagrin, displease, distress, disturb, embarrass, enrage, gall, horrify, hurt, incense, inflame, infuriate, injure, irk, irritate, laedere, madden, make angry, mortify,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 6offend — [ə fend′] vi. [ME offenden < OFr offendre < L offendere, to strike against < ob (see OB ) + fendere, to hit, strike: see DEFEND] 1. to break a law, religious commandment, etc.; commit a sin or crime 2. to create resentment, anger, or… …

    English World dictionary

  • 7offend — (v.) early 14c., to sin against (someone), from O.Fr. offendre, from L. offendere strike against, stumble, commit a fault, displease, from ob against + fendere to strike (found only in compounds). Meaning to violate (a law), to make a moral false …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8offend — [v] displease, insult affront, aggrieve, anger, annoy, antagonize, be disagreeable, disgruntle, disgust, disoblige, distress, disturb, exasperate, fret, gall, horrify, hurt, irritate, jar, miff, nauseate, nettle, outrage, pain, pique, provoke,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9offend — ► VERB 1) cause to feel hurt or resentful. 2) be displeasing to. 3) commit an act that is illegal or that goes against an accepted principle. DERIVATIVES offender noun. ORIGIN Latin offendere strike against …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10offend — of|fend [əˈfend] v [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: offendre, from Latin offendere to strike against, offend ] 1.) [I and T] to make someone angry or upset by doing or saying something that they think is rude, unkind etc ▪ His remarks… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11offend — verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French offendre, from Latin offendere to strike against, offend, from ob against + fendere to strike more at ob , defend Date: 14th century intransitive verb 1. a. to transgress the moral or divine law ; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 12offend */ — UK [əˈfend] / US verb Word forms offend : present tense I/you/we/they offend he/she/it offends present participle offending past tense offended past participle offended 1) [transitive] to make someone upset and angry by doing or saying something… …

    English dictionary

  • 13offend — verb ADVERB ▪ deeply, gravely, greatly ▪ He knew that he had offended her deeply. ▪ mortally ▪ slightly ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14offend — [[t]əfe̱nd[/t]] offends, offending, offended 1) VERB If you offend someone, you say or do something rude which upsets or embarrasses them. [V n] He apologizes for his comments and says he had no intention of offending the community... [V n] The… …

    English dictionary

  • 15offend — verb 1 (transitive usually passive) to make someone angry or upset: be offended: Richard was deeply offended that people thought he d faked the story. | I hope you won t be offended if I leave early. | offend sb: I m sorry; have I done something… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16offend — of|fend [ ə fend ] verb * 1. ) transitive to make someone upset and angry by doing or saying something: They avoided saying anything that might offend their audience. The chairman did not seem offended by the criticism. 2. ) intransitive to… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17offend — verb /əˈfɛnd/ a) To hurt the feelings of; to displease; to make angry; to insult. Your accusations offend me deeply. b) To feel or become offended, take insult. Dont worry. I dont offend easily. See Also: offense, offensive, defend …

    Wiktionary

  • 18offend — v. to offend deeply, gravely * * * [ə fend] gravely to offend deeply …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 19offend — offendable, adj. offendedly, adv. offendedness, n. offender, n. /euh fend /, v.t. 1. to irritate, annoy, or anger; cause resentful displeasure in: Even the hint of prejudice offends me. 2. to affect (the sense, taste, etc.) disagreeably. 3. to… …

    Universalium

  • 20offend — Synonyms and related words: affront, aggrieve, anger, annoy, appall, blemish, blot, breach, break, call names, chagrin, commit sin, contravene, deface, disfigure, disgruntle, disgust, dishonor, disoblige, displease, distress, disturb, do amiss,… …

    Moby Thesaurus