Occur

  • 1Occur — Oc*cur , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Occurred}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Occurring}.] [L. occurrere, occursum; ob (see {Ob }) + currere to run. See {Course}.] 1. To meet; to clash. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The resistance of the bodies they occur with. Bentley.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2Occurred — Occur Oc*cur , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Occurred}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Occurring}.] [L. occurrere, occursum; ob (see {Ob }) + currere to run. See {Course}.] 1. To meet; to clash. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The resistance of the bodies they occur with.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3Occurring — Occur Oc*cur , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Occurred}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Occurring}.] [L. occurrere, occursum; ob (see {Ob }) + currere to run. See {Course}.] 1. To meet; to clash. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The resistance of the bodies they occur with.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4Contingent — Con*tin gent, a. [L. contingens, entis, p. pr. of contingere to touch on all sides, to happen; con + tangere to touch: cf. F. contingent. See {Tangent}, {Tact}.] 1. Possible, or liable, but not certain, to occur; incidental; casual. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5mutation — mu*ta tion (m[ u]*t[=a] sh[u^]n), n. [L. mutatio, fr. mutare to change: cf. F. mutation. See {Mutable}.] Change; alteration, either in form or qualities. [1913 Webster] The vicissitude or mutations in the superior globe are no fit matter for this …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6Pass — Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one point… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7Passed — Pass Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8Passing — Pass Pass, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Passed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Passing}.] [F. passer, LL. passare, fr. L. passus step, or from pandere, passum, to spread out, lay open. See {Pace}.] 1. To go; to move; to proceed; to be moved or transferred from one… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9Penicillinase — Pen i*cil lin*ase, n. (Bioch.) an enzyme which destroys the antibacterial activity of penicillin by hydrolyzing the amide bond in the beta lactam ring. Many penicillinases are known, and are produced by a wide variety of bacteria. The production… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10come about — {v.} To take place; happen, occur. * /Sometimes it is hard to tell how a quarrel comes about./ * /When John woke up he was in the hospital, but he didn t know how that had come about./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11come to mind — {v. phr.} To occur to someone. * /A new idea for the advertising campaign came to mind as I was reading your book./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12come to pass — {v. phr.}, {literary} To happen; occur. * /Strange things come to pass in troubled times./ * /It came to pass that the jailer visited him by night./ * /His hopes of success did not come to pass./ Compare: BRING TO PASS, COME ABOUT …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13cross one's mind — or[pass through one s mind] {v. phr.} To be a sudden or passing thought; be thought of by someone; come to your mind; occur to you. * /At first Bob was puzzled by Virginia s waving, but then it crossed his mind that she was trying to tell him… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14take place — {v. phr.} To happen; occur. * /The accident took place only a block from his home./ * /The action of the play takes place in ancient Rome./ * /The dance will take place after the graduation exercises./ Compare: GO ON(3) …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15come about — {v.} To take place; happen, occur. * /Sometimes it is hard to tell how a quarrel comes about./ * /When John woke up he was in the hospital, but he didn t know how that had come about./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16come to mind — {v. phr.} To occur to someone. * /A new idea for the advertising campaign came to mind as I was reading your book./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17come to pass — {v. phr.}, {literary} To happen; occur. * /Strange things come to pass in troubled times./ * /It came to pass that the jailer visited him by night./ * /His hopes of success did not come to pass./ Compare: BRING TO PASS, COME ABOUT …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18cross one's mind — or[pass through one s mind] {v. phr.} To be a sudden or passing thought; be thought of by someone; come to your mind; occur to you. * /At first Bob was puzzled by Virginia s waving, but then it crossed his mind that she was trying to tell him… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19take place — {v. phr.} To happen; occur. * /The accident took place only a block from his home./ * /The action of the play takes place in ancient Rome./ * /The dance will take place after the graduation exercises./ Compare: GO ON(3) …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20A buck of the first head — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English