Object+of+derision

  • 1Derision — De*ri sion, n. [L. derisio: cf. F. d[ e]rision. See {Deride}.] 1. The act of deriding, or the state of being derided; mockery; scornful or contemptuous treatment which holds one up to ridicule. [1913 Webster] He that sitteth in the heavens shall… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2object — I n. 1) a material, physical object 2) a sex object 3) (grammar) a direct; indirect object 4) (misc.) an object of derision; an unidentified flying object (= UFO) II v. 1) to object strenuously, strongly, violently 2) (D; intr.) to object to (to… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 3derision — n. 1) to arouse, provoke derision 2) an object of derision * * * [dɪ rɪʒ(ə)n] provokederision an object of to arouse …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 4derision — [n] insult, disrespect backhanded compliment*, brickbat*, Bronx cheer*, butt*, comeback, contempt, contumely, crack, dig*, disdain, disparagement, dump*, jab, jest, joke, laughingstock, laughter, mockery, object of ridicule, parting shot,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 5derision — derisible /di riz euh beuhl/, adj. /di rizh euhn/, n. 1. ridicule; mockery: The inept performance elicited derision from the audience. 2. an object of ridicule. [1350 1400; ME derisioun < OF derision < LL derision (s. of derisio), equiv. to L&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 6derision — /dəˈrɪʒən/ (say duh rizhuhn) noun 1. the act of deriding; ridicule; mockery: *Some of the girls would send after them shouts of derision mingled with disappointment. –jessica anderson, 1978. 2. an object of ridicule: *He was a good player, but&#8230; …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 7derision — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Middle French, from Late Latin derision , derisio, from Latin deridēre Date: 14th century 1. a. the use of ridicule or scorn to show contempt b. a state of being derided 2. an object of ridicule or scorn …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 8derision — de•ri•sion [[t]dɪˈrɪʒ ən[/t]] n. 1) the act of deriding; ridicule; mockery 2) an object of ridicule • Etymology: 1350–1400; ME derisioun &LT; OF derision &LT; LL dērīsiō; see deride, tion de•ris′i•ble ˈrɪz ə bəl adj …

    From formal English to slang

  • 9Erotic humiliation — This article is about consensual erotic humiliation; for abusive sexual humiliation, see the main article humiliation Erotic humiliation is the consensual use of psychological humiliation in a sexual context, whereby one person gains arousal or&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 10mock — mockable, adj. mocker, n. mockingly, adv. /mok/, v.t. 1. to attack or treat with ridicule, contempt, or derision. 2. to ridicule by mimicry of action or speech; mimic derisively. 3. to mimic, imitate, or counterfeit. 4. to challenge; defy: His&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 11mock — /mɒk / (say mok) verb (t) 1. to assail or treat with ridicule or derision. 2. to ridicule by mimicry of action or speech; mimic derisively. 3. to mimic, imitate, or counterfeit. 4. to defy; set at naught. 5. to deceive, delude, or disappoint.&#8230; …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 12sport — [n1] recreational activity; entertainment action, amusement, athletics, ball, disport, diversion, exercise, frolic, fun, fun and games*, gaiety, game, games, pastime, physical activity, picnic, play, pleasure, recreation; concept 363 Ant.&#8230; …

    New thesaurus

  • 13mock — I. verb Etymology: Middle English, from moker Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to treat with contempt or ridicule ; deride 2. to disappoint the hopes of 3. defy, challenge 4. a …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 14scorn — /skɔn / (say skawn) noun 1. open or unqualified contempt; disdain. 2. mockery or derision. 3. an object of derision or contempt. 4. Obsolete a derisive or contemptuous action or speech. –verb (t) 5. to treat or regard with scorn. 6. to reject or&#8230; …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 15Teleological argument — A teleological or design argument[1][2][3] is an argument for the existence of God. The argument is based on an interpretation of teleology wherein purpose and intelligent design appear to exist in Nature beyond the scope of any such human&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 16mark — I. /mak / (say mahk) noun 1. a visible trace or impression upon anything, as a line, cut, dent, stain, bruise, etc. 2. a badge, brand, or other visible sign assumed or imposed. 3. a symbol used in writing or printing: a punctuation mark. 4. a&#8230; …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 17mark — mark1 /mahrk/, n. 1. a visible impression or trace on something, as a line, cut, dent, stain, or bruise: a small mark on his arm. 2. a badge, brand, or other visible sign assumed or imposed: a mark of his noble rank. 3. a symbol used in writing&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 18sport — sportful, adj. sportfully, adv. sportfulness, n. sportless, adj. /spawrt, spohrt/, n. 1. an athletic activity requiring skill or physical prowess and often of a competitive nature, as racing, baseball, tennis, golf, bowling, wrestling, boxing,&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 19Kaput and Zösky — is a French comic book series from the cartoonist Lewis Trondheim. It was made into an cartoon, Kaput and Zösky: The Ultimate Obliterators . While this show aired in 2003, artwork indicates creation of the characters themselves began a year&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 20mark — I [[t]mɑrk[/t]] n. 1) a visible impression on a surface, as a line, spot, scratch, dent, or stain 2) a symbol used in writing or printing: a punctuation mark[/ex] 3) a token or indication; sign: to bow as a mark of respect[/ex] 4) a noticeable or …

    From formal English to slang