Joust

  • 1 Joust — Entwickler Williams Electronics Publisher …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 2 Joust — Éditeur Williams Electronics Développeur Williams Electronics Concepteur John Newcomer D …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 3 Joust — Разработчик Williams Electronics Издатель Williams Electronics …

    Википедия

  • 4 Joust — (joust or j[u^]st; 277), v. i. [OE. justen, jousten, OF. jouster, jouster, joster, F. jouter, fr. L. juxta near to, nigh, from the root of jungere to join. See {Join}, and cf. {Jostle}.] 1. To engage in mock combat on horseback, as two knights in …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Joust — Joust, n. [OE. juste, jouste, OF. juste, jouste, joste, F. joute. See {Joust}, v. i.] 1. A tilting match; a mock combat on horseback between two knights in the lists or inclosed field. [Written also {just}.] [1913 Webster] Gorgeous knights at… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 joust — [joust; jo͞ost, just] n. [ME jouste < OFr < jouster: see JOUST the vi.] 1. a combat with lances between two knights on horseback; esp., such a formal combat as part of a tournament 2. [pl.] a tournament vi. [ME justen < OFr jouster,… …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 joust — [dʒaust] v 1.) to fight with ↑lances (=long sticks) while riding horses, as part of a formal competition in the past 2.) to compete or argue with someone joust with ▪ The minister and I have often jousted with each other. >joust[i] n …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 8 joust — [ dʒaust ] verb intransitive 1. ) to argue or compete 2. ) if two people riding horses joust, they fight by riding toward each other and trying to hit each other with a LANCE (=long stick) ╾ joust noun count …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 9 joust — joust; joust·er; …

    English syllables

  • 10 joust — index compete, fight (battle) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 11 joust — ► VERB 1) (of a medieval knight) engage in a contest in which two opponents on horseback fight with lances. 2) compete for superiority. ► NOUN ▪ a jousting contest. DERIVATIVES jouster noun. ORIGIN Old French jouster bring together , from Latin …

    English terms dictionary

  • 12 joust — UK [dʒaʊst] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms joust : present tense I/you/we/they joust he/she/it jousts present participle jousting past tense jousted past participle jousted 1) to argue or compete 2) if two people riding horses joust, they… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 joust — jouster, n. /jowst, just, joohst/, n. 1. a combat in which two knights on horseback attempted to unhorse each other with blunted lances. 2. this type of combat fought in a highly formalized manner as part of a tournament. 3. jousts, tournament. 4 …

    Universalium

  • 14 joust — {{11}}joust (n.) c.1300, from O.Fr. joustes, from joster (see JOUST (Cf. joust) (v.)). The sport was popular with Anglo Norman knights. These early tournaments were very rough affairs, in every sense, quite unlike the chivalrous contests of later …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 15 joust — [[t]ʤa͟ʊst[/t]] jousts, jousting, jousted 1) V RECIP When two or more people or organizations joust, they compete to see who is better. [LITERARY] [pl n V] ...lawyers joust in the courtroom... [V with n] The oil company jousts with Esso for lead… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 Joust — The joust was the familiar fight between knights on horseback with lance and shield. It evolved from the *hastilude and *melee, becoming an exhibition but one using real skills, with a genuine threat of serious injury or death. Unlike the melee,… …

    Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • 17 joust — I. intransitive verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French juster to unite, joust, from Vulgar Latin *juxtare, from Latin juxta near; akin to Latin jungere to join more at yoke Date: 14th century 1. a. to fight on horseback as a knight or… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 joust — [13] The underlying meaning of joust is simply an ‘encounter’. The word came from Old French juster, which originally meant ‘bring together’, and hence by extension ‘join battle’ and ‘fight on horse back’. The Old French verb goes back to Vulgar… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 19 Joust — Tournament or combat of two mounted knights, tilting using lances. The charge of two knights bearing shield and lance. See also the Joust of Peace and Joust of War …

    Medieval glossary

  • 20 joust — [[t]dʒaʊst, dʒʌst, dʒust[/t]] n. 1) why a combat in which two mounted knights armed with lances attempted to unhorse each other, esp. as part of a tournament 2) a personal competition or struggle 3) why to engage in a joust 4) to contend or… …

    From formal English to slang