Into+disrepute

  • 1bring into disrepute — index decry, demean (make lower) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2bring oneself into disrepute — disgrace oneself, destroy one s own reputation …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 3disrepute — noun VERB + DISREPUTE ▪ fall into ▪ The old system had fallen into disrepute. ▪ bring sth into ▪ Such wild claims bring science into disrepute. ▪ The players conduct is likely to bring the game into …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 4disrepute — /dɪsrəˈpjut / (say disruh pyooht) noun 1. ill repute: that policy is in disrepute. –phrase 2. bring into disrepute, to discredit: this would bring the administration of justice into disrepute. 3. fall into disrepute, to become discredited. Also,… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 5disrepute — n. 1) to fall into disrepute 2) to hold smb. in disrepute * * * [ˌdɪsrɪ pjuːt] to fall into disrepute to hold smb. in disrepute …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 6disrepute — [[t]dɪ̱srɪpju͟ːt[/t]] PHRASE: PHR after v, v link PHR If something is brought into disrepute or falls into disrepute, it loses its good reputation, because it is connected with activities that people do not approve of. It is a disgrace that such… …

    English dictionary

  • 7disrepute — dis|re|pute [ˌdısrıˈpju:t] n [U] a situation in which people no longer admire or trust someone or something ▪ He faces six charges of bringing the game into disrepute . ▪ This theory fell into disrepute in the fifties …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 8disrepute — dis|re|pute [ ,dısrı pjut ] noun uncount FORMAL a situation in which people have no respect for someone or something: bring something into disrepute: The president brought his office into disrepute and betrayed the people s trust …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 9disrepute — noun (U) bring sb/sth into disrepute to make people stop trusting or having a good opinion of an activity, idea, organization etc: When one policeman is convicted of corruption, it brings the whole system into disrepute …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10disrepute — UK [ˌdɪsrɪˈpjuːt] / US [ˌdɪsrɪˈpjut] noun [uncountable] formal a situation in which people have no respect for someone or something bring something into disrepute: The president brought his office into disrepute and betrayed the people s trust …

    English dictionary

  • 11disrepute — /dis ri pyooht /, n. bad repute; low regard; disfavor (usually prec. by in or into): Some literary theories have fallen into disrepute. [1645 55; DIS 1 + REPUTE] Syn. disfavor, disgrace. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 12disrepute — noun she had brought the family name into disrepute Syn: disgrace, shame, dishonor, infamy, notoriety, ignominy, bad reputation; humiliation, discredit, ill repute, low esteem, opprobrium, obloquy Ant: honor …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 13disrepute — [ˌdɪsrɪˈpjuːt] noun bring sb/sth into disrepute formal to cause people to stop respecting someone or something[/ex] …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 14disrepute — n. a lack of good reputation or respectability; discredit (esp. fall into disrepute) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 15Disrepute — Dis re*pute , n. Loss or want of reputation; ill character; disesteem; discredit. [1913 Webster] At the beginning of the eighteenth century astrology fell into general disrepute. Sir W. Scott. Syn: Disesteem; discredit; dishonor; disgrace. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16Disrepute — Dis re*pute , v. t. To bring into disreputation; to hold in dishonor. [R.] [1913 Webster] More inclined to love them than to disrepute them. Jer. Taylor. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17Disrepute — (Roget s Thesaurus) < N PARAG:Disrepute >N GRP: N 1 Sgm: N 1 disrepute disrepute discredit Sgm: N 1 ill repute ill repute bad repute bad name bad odor bad favor ill name ill odor ill favor Sgm: N 1 disapprobation …

    English dictionary for students

  • 18disrepute — 1. noun Loss or want of reputation; ill character; disesteem; discredit. Herbarium material does not, indeed, allow one to extrapolate safely: what you see is what you get; what you get is classical alpha taxonomy which is, very largely and for… …

    Wiktionary

  • 19R. v. Collins — SCCInfoBox case name=R. v. Collins full case name=Ruby Collins v. Her Majesty The Queen heard date=May 27, 1986 decided date=April 9, 1987 citations= [1987] 1 S.C.R. 265 docket=17937 history=Judgment for the Crown in the Court of Appeal for… …

    Wikipedia

  • 20George Galloway — Infobox MP honorific prefix = name =George Galloway honorific suffix = MP caption = Galloway in 2007. birth date =birth date and age |df=yes|1954|8|16 birth place =Dundee, Scotland residence = death date = death place = salary = term start = 5… …

    Wikipedia