Grounded+on+probable+evidence

  • 1probable — Having the appearance of truth; having the character of probability; appearing to be founded in reason or experience. Having more evidence for than against; supported by evidence which inclines the mind to believe, but leaves some room for doubt; …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 2Presumptive evidence — Presumptive Pre*sump tive, a. [Cf. F. pr[ e]somptif.] 1. Based on presumption or probability; grounded on probable evidence; probable; as, presumptive proof. [1913 Webster] 2. Presumptuous; arrogant. [R.] Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3Presumptive — Pre*sump tive, a. [Cf. F. pr[ e]somptif.] 1. Based on presumption or probability; grounded on probable evidence; probable; as, presumptive proof. [1913 Webster] 2. Presumptuous; arrogant. [R.] Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster] {Presumptive evidence}… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4Presumptive heir — Presumptive Pre*sump tive, a. [Cf. F. pr[ e]somptif.] 1. Based on presumption or probability; grounded on probable evidence; probable; as, presumptive proof. [1913 Webster] 2. Presumptuous; arrogant. [R.] Sir T. Browne. [1913 Webster]… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5presumptive — a. Grounded on probable evidence, probable …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 6Conclusive presumption — Presumption Pre*sump tion (?; 215), n. [L. praesumptio: cf. F. pr[ e]somption, OF. also presumpcion. See {Presume}.] 1. The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence; the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon incomplete… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7Presumption — Pre*sump tion (?; 215), n. [L. praesumptio: cf. F. pr[ e]somption, OF. also presumpcion. See {Presume}.] 1. The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence; the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon incomplete proof. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8Presumption of fact — Presumption Pre*sump tion (?; 215), n. [L. praesumptio: cf. F. pr[ e]somption, OF. also presumpcion. See {Presume}.] 1. The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence; the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon incomplete… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9Presumption of law — Presumption Pre*sump tion (?; 215), n. [L. praesumptio: cf. F. pr[ e]somption, OF. also presumpcion. See {Presume}.] 1. The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence; the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon incomplete… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10believable — I adjective conceivable, convincing, credential, credible, creditable, dependable, incontestable, incontrovertible, indisputable, indubitable, irrefragable, irrefutable, likely, persuasive, plausible, presumable, probable, reliable, sure, tenable …

    Law dictionary

  • 11biblical literature — Introduction       four bodies of written works: the Old Testament writings according to the Hebrew canon; intertestamental works, including the Old Testament Apocrypha; the New Testament writings; and the New Testament Apocrypha.       The Old… …

    Universalium

  • 12Antarctica — /ant ahrk ti keuh, ahr ti /, n. the continent surrounding the South Pole: almost entirely covered by an ice sheet. ab. 5,000,000 sq. mi. (12,950,000 sq. km). Also called Antarctic Continent. * * * Antarctica Introduction Antarctica Background:… …

    Universalium

  • 13USA PATRIOT Act, Title II — The USA PATRIOT Act was passed by the United States Congress in 2001 as a response to the September 11, 2001 attacks. It has ten titles, each containing numerous sections. Title II: Enhanced Surveillance Procedures granted increased powers of… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14Patriot Debates — The American Bar Association passed resolutions on the USA PATRIOT Act that asked the U.S. Government to conduct a thorough review of the implementation of the powers granted to the Executive Branch under the Act before considering legislation… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15Metaphysical naturalism — This article is about the worldview. For the methodological paradigm, see Methodological naturalism. Part of a series on Irreligion …

    Wikipedia

  • 16Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …

    Universalium

  • 17Hellenistic biological sciences — R.J.Kankinson The five centuries that separate Aristotle’s death in 322 BC from Galen’s ascendancy in Rome in the latter part of the second century AD were fertile ones for the biological sciences, in particular medicine. Nor is the period solely …

    History of philosophy

  • 18Hindenburg disaster — Infobox Aircraft accident name = LZ 129 Hindenburg caption = Hindenburg a few seconds after catching fire. date = May 6, 1937 type = Airship fire site = Lakehurst Naval Air Station in Manchester Township, New Jersey coords =… …

    Wikipedia

  • 19Christianity — /kris chee an i tee/, n., pl. Christianities. 1. the Christian religion, including the Catholic, Protestant, and Eastern Orthodox churches. 2. Christian beliefs or practices; Christian quality or character: Christianity mixed with pagan elements; …

    Universalium

  • 20science, philosophy of — Branch of philosophy that attempts to elucidate the nature of scientific inquiry observational procedures, patterns of argument, methods of representation and calculation, metaphysical presuppositions and evaluate the grounds of their validity… …

    Universalium