Except

  • 1 Except — Ex*cept , prep. [Originally past participle, or verb in the imperative mode.] With exclusion of; leaving or left out; excepting. [1913 Webster] God and his Son except, Created thing naught valued he nor . . . shunned. Milton. Syn: {Except},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 except — [ek sept′, iksept′] vt. [ME excepten < OFr excepter < L exceptare, to take out, except < exceptus, pp. of excipere < ex , out + capere, to take: see HAVE] to leave out or take out; make an exception of; exclude; omit vi. Now Rare to… …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 except — Ⅰ. except UK US /ɪkˈsept/ preposition (also except for) ► used to mean not including or but not : »Our offices are open Monday through Friday except on national holidays. » All money transfers, except for those between members of the same branch …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4 Except — Ex*cept , v. i. To take exception; to object; usually followed by to, sometimes by against; as, to except to a witness or his testimony. [1913 Webster] Except thou wilt except against my love. Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Except — Ex*cept ([e^]k*s[e^]pt ), conj. Unless; if it be not so that. [1913 Webster] And he said, I will not let thee go, except thou bless me. Gen. xxxii. 26. [1913 Webster] But yesterday you never opened lip, Except, indeed, to drink. Tennyson. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 except — ex·cept /ik sept/ vt: to take or leave out (as from insurance coverage or a deed): exclude specifically except ed the air carriers and unions from the provisions M. A. Kelly vi: object; esp: to fi …

    Law dictionary

  • 7 Except — Ex*cept , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Excepted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Excepting}.] [L. exceptus, p. p. of excipere to take or draw out, to except; ex out + capere to take: cf. F. excepter. See {Capable}.] 1. To take or leave out (anything) from a number or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 except — [prep] other than apart from, aside from, bar, barring, besides, but, excepting, excluding, exclusive of, exempting, if not, lacking, leaving out, minus, not for, omitting, outside of, rejecting, save, saving, short of, without, with the… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 except — late 14c., to receive, from M.Fr. excepter (12c.), from L. exceptus, pp. of excipere take out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + capere to take (see CAPABLE (Cf. capable)). Meaning to leave out is from 1510s. Related …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 10 except — ► PREPOSITION ▪ not including; other than. ► CONJUNCTION ▪ used before a statement that forms an exception to one just made. ► VERB ▪ exclude: present company excepted. ORIGIN from Latin excipere take out …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 except — ex|cept1 W2S2 [ıkˈsept] conj, prep 1.) used to introduce the only person, thing, action, fact, or situation about which a statement is not true ▪ The office is open every day except Sundays. ▪ You can have any of the cakes except this one. except …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 except — ex|cept1 [ ık sept ] function word *** Except can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): We haven t told anyone except Leslie s dad. as a conjunction (followed by a clause or adverbial phrase): I d go and see him… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 except — 1 /Ik sept/ conjunction 1 except for a) apart from: Except for one old lady, the bus was empty. | The roads were clear except for a few cars. b) except for John/her/me etc leaving out or not including John, her etc: The children are all asleep… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 except — I UK [ɪkˈsept] / US conjunction, preposition *** Summary: Except can be used in the following ways: as a preposition (followed by a noun): We haven t told anyone except Leslie s dad. as a conjunction (followed by a clause or adverbial phrase): I… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 except — accept, except There is little danger of confusion in spoken contexts, since all they have in common is their similar pronunciation in running discourse, but their spelling is open to confusion. David Crystal reports in his book Who Cares About… …

    Modern English usage

  • 16 except*/*/*/ — [ɪkˈsept] grammar word summary: Except can be: ■ a preposition: We haven t told anyone except Leslie s dad. ■ a conjunction: I d go and see him myself, except I don t know where he lives. ■ used before a conjunction: I don t know much about the… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 17 except — [[t]ɪkse̱pt[/t]] ♦♦ 1) PREP You use except to introduce the only thing or person that a statement does not apply to, or a fact that prevents a statement from being completely true. I wouldn t have accepted anything except a job in Europe... I don …

    English dictionary

  • 18 except — except1 /ik sept /, prep. 1. with the exclusion of; excluding; save; but: They were all there except me. 2. except for, if it were not for: She would travel more except for lack of money. conj. 3. only; with the exception (usually fol. by that):… …

    Universalium

  • 19 except — I. /əkˈsɛpt / (say uhk sept), /ɛk / (say ek ) preposition 1. with the exclusion of; excluding; save; but: they were all there except me. –conjunction 2. Also, except that. with the exception that: parallel cases except A is younger than B. 3.… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 20 except — I. preposition also excepting Date: 14th century with the exclusion or exception of < daily except Sundays > II. verb Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French excepter, from Latin exceptare, frequentative of excipere to take out, except, from …

    New Collegiate Dictionary