Embark

  • 1embark — em‧bark [ɪmˈbɑːk ǁ ɑːrk] verb [intransitive] TRAVEL if passengers embark, they get on a ship or plane: • Passengers should assemble in the lounge before embarking. * * * embark UK US /ɪmˈbɑːk/ verb ► [I] to go onto a ship, aircraft, or train:… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2Embark — Em*bark , v. i. 1. To go on board a vessel or a boat for a voyage; as, the troops embarked for Lisbon. [1913 Webster] 2. To engage in any affair. [1913 Webster] Slow to embark in such an undertaking. Macaulay. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3embark — ► VERB 1) go on board a ship or aircraft. 2) (embark on/upon) begin (a new project or course of action). DERIVATIVES embarkation noun. ORIGIN French embarquer, from barque bark, ship …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4Embark — Em*bark , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Embarked}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Embarking}.] [F. embarquer; pref. em (L. in) + barque bark: cf. Sp. embarcar, It. imbarcare. See {Bark}. a vessel.] 1. To cause to go on board a vessel or boat; to put on shipboard. [1913 …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5embark — I verb auspicate, begin, commence, conscendere, engage in an enterprise, enter, enter upon, get under way, go into, inaugurate, initiate, institute, launch, make a beginning, originate, plunge into, rationem inire, set out, start, start out, take …

    Law dictionary

  • 6embark on — index commence Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 7embark — 1540s, from M.Fr. embarquer, from em (see EN (Cf. en ) (1)) + barque small ship (see BARK (Cf. bark) (n.)). Related: Embarked; embarking …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8embark — [v] get on transportation object board, commence, emplane, enter, entrain, go aboard ship, launch, leave port, plunge into, put on board, set about, set out, set sail, take on board, take ship; concepts 159,195,224 Ant. disembark, stay …

    New thesaurus

  • 9embark on — [v] begin undertaking, journey broach, commence, engage, enter, get off, initiate, jump off, launch, open, plunge into, set about, set out, set to, start, take up, tee off*; concepts 100,221 …

    New thesaurus

  • 10embark — [em bärk′, imbärk′] vt. [Fr embarquer < Sp or OProv embarcar < em (L in ) + L barca, BARK3] 1. to put or take (passengers or goods) aboard a ship, aircraft, etc. 2. to engage (a person) or invest (money, etc.) in an enterprise vi. 1. to go… …

    English World dictionary

  • 11embark — v. 1) (D; intr.) to embark for (to embark for France) 2) (d; intr.) to embark on (to embark on a new career) * * * [ɪm bɑːk] (D; intr.) to embark for (to embark for France) (d; intr.) to embark on (to embark on a new career) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 12embark on — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms embark on : present tense I/you/we/they embark on he/she/it embarks on present participle embarking on past tense embarked on past participle embarked on 1) embark on or embark upon to start a new project or… …

    English dictionary

  • 13embark — verb PHRASAL VERB embark on/upon sth ADVERB ▪ immediately ▪ reluctantly ▪ recently ▪ The company has recently embarked on a new venture …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14embark — em|bark [ ım bark ] verb intransitive or transitive ** to get on a ship in order to begin a trip, or to put someone or something on a ship: We embarked at Naples. ─ opposite DISEMBARK ╾ em|bar|ka|tion [ ,embar keıʃn ] noun count or uncount em… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15embark on — verb get off the ground (Freq. 3) Who started this company? We embarked on an exciting enterprise I start my day with a good breakfast We began the new semester The afternoon session begins at 4 PM The blood shed started when the partisans… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 16embark */*/ — UK [ɪmˈbɑː(r)k] / US [ɪmˈbɑrk] verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms embark : present tense I/you/we/they embark he/she/it embarks present participle embarking past tense embarked past participle embarked to get on a ship in order to begin a… …

    English dictionary

  • 17embark on — phr verb Embark on is used with these nouns as the subject: ↑passenger Embark on is used with these nouns as the object: ↑adventure, ↑career, ↑crusade, ↑enterprise, ↑exercise, ↑expansion, ↑expedition, ↑programme, ↑ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 18embark — em|bark [ımˈba:k US a:rk] v [I and T] [Date: 1500 1600; : French; Origin: embarquer, from barque ship ; BARQUE] to go onto a ship or a plane, or to put or take something onto a ship or plane ≠ ↑disembark >embarkation [ˌemba:ˈkeıʃən US ba:r ] n …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19embark — [16] To embark is literally to ‘put or get on to a boat’ – or more specifically a barque [15] (a word acquired ultimately from late Latin barca, which is probably related to English barge). Its immediate French ancestor, barque, formed the basis… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 20embark — [[t]ɪmbɑ͟ː(r)k[/t]] embarks, embarking, embarked 1) VERB If you embark on something new, difficult, or exciting, you start doing it. [V on/upon n] He s embarking on a new career as a writer... [V on/upon n] The government embarked on a programme… …

    English dictionary