Drudge

  • 1 Drudge — Drudge, v. t. To consume laboriously; with away. [1913 Webster] Rise to our toils and drudge away the day. Otway. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Drudge — Drudge, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Drudged}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Drudging}.] [OE. druggen; prob not akin to E. drag, v. t., but fr. Celtic; cf. Ir. drugaire a slave or drudge.] To perform menial work; to labor in mean or unpleasant offices with toil and… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 Drudge — Drudge, n. One who drudges; one who works hard in servile employment; a mental servant. Milton. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 drudge — [drʌdʒ] n someone who does hard boring work >drudge v [I] …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 5 drudge — [n] slave, very hard worker factotum, grind*, laborer, menial, nose to grindstone*, peon*, plodder*, servant, toiler, workaholic, worker, workhorse; concept 348 Ant. idler, laze drudge [v] work very hard back to the salt mines*, dig, grind*,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 6 drudge — index labor, palliative (abating), strive Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 7 drudge — [ drʌdʒ ] noun count someone who has to do a lot of boring and unpleasant work …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 8 drudge — (n.) late 15c., one employed in mean, servile, or distasteful work, missing in O.E. and M.E. (but Cf. M.E. druggen do menial or monotonous work; druggunge, mid 13c., in Barnhart), but apparently related to O.E. dreogan to work, suffer, endure… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 drudge — ► NOUN ▪ a person made to do hard, menial, or dull work. ORIGIN of unknown origin; perhaps related to DRAG(Cf. ↑drag) …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 drudge — [druj] n. [ME druggen, prob. < OE dreogan: see DREE] a person who does hard, menial, or tedious work vi. drudged, drudging to do such work …

    English World dictionary

  • 11 Drudge — A drudge is a person who does tedious, menial, or unpleasant work; it can also refer to the work itself, known as drudgery. Drudge can also refer to: Matt Drudge, an American Internet journalist. Drudge Report, Matt Drudge s website. Drudge (TV… …

    Wikipedia

  • 12 drudge —    Used of someone who slaves away at uninteresting and unrewarding work, a hack. Dr Johnson famously defined ‘lexicographer’ in his Dictionary as ‘a writer of dictionaries; a harmless drudge that busies himself in tracing the original, and… …

    A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • 13 drudge — UK [drʌdʒ] / US noun [countable] Word forms drudge : singular drudge plural drudges someone who has to do a lot of boring and unpleasant work …

    English dictionary

  • 14 drudge — [15] No one is quite sure where drudge comes from. It is first recorded, as a noun, towards the end of the 15th century, and the verb followed about fifty years later. One possible source may be the Middle English verb drugge ‘pull laboriously’,… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 15 drudge — [[t]drʌ̱ʤ[/t]] drudges N COUNT If you describe someone as a drudge, you mean they have to work hard at a job which is not very important or interesting …

    English dictionary

  • 16 drudge — noun (C) someone who does hard boring work drudge verb (I) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 drudge — 1. noun a household drudge Syn: menial worker, slave, lackey, servant, laborer, worker, cog; informal gofer, runner, bottle washer, serf 2. verb, archaic he drudged in the fields See …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 18 drudge —   Pa u, pa aua, kauā pa aua. See saying, anus.    ♦ To treat as a drudge, ho opa u, ho opa aua …

    English-Hawaiian dictionary

  • 19 drudge — [15] No one is quite sure where drudge comes from. It is first recorded, as a noun, towards the end of the 15th century, and the verb followed about fifty years later. One possible source may be the Middle English verb drugge ‘pull laboriously’,… …

    Word origins

  • 20 drudge — I. verb (drudged; drudging) Etymology: Middle English druggen Date: 14th century intransitive verb to do hard, menial, or monotonous work transitive verb to force to do hard, menial, or monotonous work • drudger noun II …

    New Collegiate Dictionary