Demur

  • 1 demur — de·mur /di mər/ vi de·murred, de·mur·ring: to interpose a demurrer demur to the declaration de·mur·ra·ble adj Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 demur — vb Demur, scruple, balk, jib, shy, boggle, stick, stickle, strain are comparable when they mean to hesitate or show reluctance because of difficulties in the way. One demurs to or at something when one raises objections to it, casts doubt upon it …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3 demur — meaning ‘to raise scruples or objections’ has inflected forms demurred, demurring. It is normally used in negative contexts and without a complement (When asked they did not demur), although it is occasionally followed by at or to (did not demur… …

    Modern English usage

  • 4 Demur — De*mur , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Demurred}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Demurring}.] [OF. demurer, demorer, demourer, to linger, stay, F. demeurer, fr. L. demorari; de + morari to delay, tarry, stay, mora delay; prob. originally, time for thinking, reflection …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Demur — De*mur , v. t. 1. To suspend judgment concerning; to doubt of or hesitate about. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The latter I demur, for in their looks Much reason, and in their actions, oft appears. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. To cause delay to; to put off …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 Demur — De*mur , n. [OF. demor, demore, stay, delay. See {Demur}, v. i.] Stop; pause; hesitation as to proceeding; suspense of decision or action; scruple. [1913 Webster] All my demurs but double his attacks; At last he whispers, Do; and we go snacks.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 demur — ► VERB (demurred, demurring) ▪ raise doubts or objections; show reluctance. ► NOUN ▪ the action of demurring: they accepted without demur. DERIVATIVES demurral noun. ORIGIN Old French demourer, from Latin morari delay …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 demur — (v.) c.1200, to linger, tarry, delay, from O.Fr. demorer delay, retard, from L. demorari to linger, loiter, tarry, from de (see DE (Cf. de )) + morari to delay, from mora a pause, delay, from PIE *mere . Main modern sense of raise objections is f …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 demur — [v] disagree balk, cavil, challenge, combat, complain, deprecate, disapprove, dispute, doubt, fight, hem and haw*, hesitate, object, oppose, pause, protest, pussyfoot*, refuse, remonstrate, resist, scruple, shy, stick, stickle, strain, take… …

    New thesaurus

  • 10 demur — [dē mʉr′, dimʉr′] vi. demurred, demurring [ME demuren < OFr demorer < L demorari, to delay < de , from + morari, to delay < mora, a delay < IE base * (s)mer , to remember > MEMORY] 1. to hesitate because of one s doubts or… …

    English World dictionary

  • 11 demur — v. (formal) (D; intr.) ( to object ) to demur at, to (to demur at a proposal) * * * [ dɪ mɜː] to (to demur at a proposal) (formal) (D; intr.) ( to object ) to demur at …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 12 demur — I UK [dɪˈmɜː(r)] / US [dɪˈmɜr] verb [intransitive] Word forms demur : present tense I/you/we/they demur he/she/it demurs present participle demurring past tense demurred past participle demurred formal a) to refuse to do something b) to say that… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 demur — de|mur1 [dıˈmə: US ˈmə:r] v past tense and past participle demurred present participle demurring [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: demorer, from [i]Latin morari to stay, delay ] to express doubt about or opposition to a plan or suggestion ▪ …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 demur — de|mur1 [ dı mɜr ] verb intransitive FORMAL to refuse to do something a. to say you do not approve of something demur de|mur 2 [ dı mɜr ] noun uncount FORMAL refusal or disagreement: without demur: Both teams accepted the decision without demur …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 15 demur — [[t]dɪmɜ͟ː(r)[/t]] demurs, demurring, demurred 1) VERB If you demur, you say that you do not agree with something or will not do something that you have been asked to do. [FORMAL] Hunt wanted to know, would I be prepared to take over the whole… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 demur — 1. verb /dɪˈmɜː/ a) To delay; to pause; to suspend proceedings or judgment in view of a doubt or difficulty; to hesitate; to put off the determination or conclusion of an affair. Yet durst not demur nor abide upon the camp. Nicols? b) To scruple… …

    Wiktionary

  • 17 demur — 1 verb demurred, demurring (I) formal to express doubt about or opposition to a plan or suggestion: They demurred at the idea of working on a Sunday. 2 noun (U) formal disagreement or disapproval: without demur: I agreed to this without demur …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 demur — [13] Like its French cousin demeurer, demur originally meant ‘stay, linger’. It was not until the 17th century that the current sense, ‘raise objections’, developed, via earlier ‘delay’ and ‘hesitate in uncertainty’. The word comes via Old French …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 19 demur — [dɪ mə:] verb (demurs, demurring, demurred) raise doubts or objections; show reluctance. noun the action of demurring: they accepted this ruling without demur. Derivatives demurral noun Origin ME: from OFr. demourer (v.), demeure (n.), based on L …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 20 demur — 1. verb Steve demurred when the suggestion was made Syn: object, take exception, take issue, protest, cavil, dissent; voice reservations, be unwilling, be reluctant, balk, think twice; drag one s heels, refuse; informal boggle, kick up a fuss 2.… …

    Thesaurus of popular words