Deliver+a+lecture+to

  • 1 deliver a lecture — give a lecture …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 2 Lecture — Lec ture, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Lectured} ( t[ u]rd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Lecturing}.] 1. To read or deliver a lecture to. [1913 Webster] 2. To reprove formally and with authority. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 Lecture — Lec ture, v. i. To deliver a lecture or lectures. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 deliver — [[t]dɪlɪ̱və(r)[/t]] ♦♦ delivers, delivering, delivered 1) VERB If you deliver something somewhere, you take it there. [V n to n] The Canadians plan to deliver more food to southern Somalia... [V n] The spy returned to deliver a second batch of… …

    English dictionary

  • 5 lecture — I n. formal talk 1) to deliver, give a lecture 2) to attend; follow ( understand ) a lecture 3) a lecture about, on 4) at a lecture reprimand 5) to give smb. a lecture (about smt.) II v. 1) (D; intr.) ( to discuss formally ) to lecture about, on… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 6 lecture — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, act of reading, from Late Latin lectura, from Latin lectus, past participle of legere Date: 15th century 1. a discourse given before an audience or class especially for instruction 2. a formal reproof •… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 lecture — lec|ture1 W3S3 [ˈlektʃə US ər] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Late Latin; Origin: lectura act of reading , from Latin legere to read ] 1.) a long talk on a particular subject that someone gives to a group of people, especially to students in a university… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 8 lecture — /ˈlɛktʃə / (say lekchuh) noun 1. a discourse read or delivered before an audience, especially for instruction or to set forth some subject: a lecture on Picasso. 2. a speech of warning or reproof as to conduct; a long, tedious reprimand: *The… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 9 lecture — /lek cheuhr/, n., v., lectured, lecturing. n. 1. a speech read or delivered before an audience or class, esp. for instruction or to set forth some subject: a lecture on Picasso s paintings. 2. a speech of warning or reproof as to conduct; a long …

    Universalium

  • 10 deliver — verb 1》 bring and hand over (a letter or goods) to the appropriate recipient.     ↘formally hand over (someone). 2》 provide (something promised or expected).     ↘Law acknowledge that one intends to be bound by (a deed), either explicitly by… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 11 lecture — lec•ture [[t]ˈlɛk tʃər[/t]] n. v. tured, tur•ing 1) a discourse read or delivered before an audience or class, esp. for instruction: a lecture on modern art[/ex] 2) a long speech of warning or reproof as to conduct 3) to give a lecture or series… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 12 lecture — n. & v. n. 1 a discourse giving information about a subject to a class or other audience. 2 a long serious speech esp. as a scolding or reprimand. v. 1 intr. (often foll. by on) deliver a lecture or lectures. 2 tr. talk seriously or reprovingly… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 13 lecture — Synonyms and related words: address, admonish, admonishment, admonition, assignment, berate, berating, bring to book, call to account, castigation, censure, chalk talk, chastise, chastisement, chew out, chide, chiding, correct, correction,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 14 lecture — I. n. 1. Discourse, prelection. 2. Censure, lesson, lecturing, reprimand, reproof, scolding. II. v. a. 1. Deliver a lecture to. 2. Reprove, reprimand, scold, chide, rate …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 15 lecture — [n1] lesson, speech address, allocution, chalk talk*, discourse, disquisition, harangue, instruction, oration, pep talk*, pitch*, soapbox*, spiel*, talk; concepts 60,278 lecture [n2] speech of criticism castigation, censure, chiding, dressing… …

    New thesaurus

  • 16 lecture — ► NOUN 1) an educational talk to an audience, especially one of students in a university. 2) a lengthy reprimand or warning. ► VERB 1) deliver an educational lecture or lectures. 2) talk seriously or reprovingly to. ORIGIN Latin lectura, from… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 17 deliver — de|liv|er W2S2 [dıˈlıvə US ər] v ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(take something somewhere)¦ 2 deliver a speech/lecture/address etc 3¦(do something you should do)¦ 4¦(baby)¦ 5¦(blow/shock etc)¦ 6 deliver a judgment/verdict 7¦(person)¦ 8¦(votes)¦ 9¦(make somebody free… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18 deliver */*/*/ — UK [dɪˈlɪvə(r)] / US [dɪˈlɪvər] verb Word forms deliver : present tense I/you/we/they deliver he/she/it delivers present participle delivering past tense delivered past participle delivered 1) [transitive] to take something, especially goods or… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 deliver — de|liv|er [ dı lıvər ] verb *** ▸ 1 take something/someone to place ▸ 2 give formal talk ▸ 3 provide something (promised) ▸ 4 in computing ▸ 5 help woman give birth ▸ 6 give someone a hard hit ▸ 7 free someone from situation ▸ + PHRASES 1. )… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 20 deliver — verb 1 TAKE STH SOMEWHERE (I) to take goods, letters etc to the place where they have been sent: Do you deliver on Saturdays? | deliver sth to: Could you deliver this letter to the accounts department? | have sth delivered: I m having some… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English