Contradict

  • 1 Contradict — Con tra*dict , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Contradicted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Contradicting}.] [L. contradictus, p. p. of contradicere to speak against; contra + dicere to speak. See {Diction}.] 1. To assert the contrary of; to oppose in words; to take… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 contradict — [kän΄trə dikt′] vt. [< L contradictus, pp. of contradicere < contra , CONTRA + dicere, to speak: see DICTION] 1. a) to assert the opposite of (what someone else has said) b) to deny the statement of (a person) 2. to declare (a statement,… …

    English World dictionary

  • 3 Contradict — Con tra*dict, v. i. To oppose in words; to gainsay; to deny, or assert the contrary of, something. [1913 Webster] They . . . spake against those things which were spoken by Paul, contradicting and blaspheming. Acts xiii. 45. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 contradict — I verb ab re discrepare, abrogate, affirm the contrary, annul, answer back, argue, assert the contrary, assert the opposite, challenge, clash, come in conflict with, conflict, confute, contradicere, contrast, contravene, controvert, counter,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 contradict — 1570s, speak against, also assert the contrary (1580s), from L. contradictus, pp. of contradicere (see CONTRADICTION (Cf. contradiction)). Related: Contradicted; contradicting; contradictive …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 contradict — *deny, gainsay, negative, contravene, traverse, impugn Analogous words: dispute (see DISCUSS): controvert, *disprove, refute, confute: belie, falsify, garble (see MISREPRESENT) Antonyms: corroborate Contrasted words: *confirm, verify,… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7 contradict — [v] be at variance with belie, buck, call in question*, challenge, confront, contravene, controvert, counter, counteract, cross, dare, deny, differ, disaffirm, disclaim, disprove, dispute, fly in the face of*, gainsay, have bone to pick*, impugn …

    New thesaurus

  • 8 contradict — ► VERB 1) deny the truth of (a statement) by asserting the opposite. 2) challenge (someone) by making a statement opposing one made by them. DERIVATIVES contradictor noun. ORIGIN Latin contradicere speak against …

    English terms dictionary

  • 9 contradict — 01. Cuts to the health budget seem to [contradict] the governor s promise to improve health care in our state. 02. The marks on the prisoner s body [contradicted] government claims that he had died of natural causes. 03. What he says, and what he …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 10 contradict — [[t]kɒ̱ntrədɪ̱kt[/t]] contradicts, contradicting, contradicted 1) VERB If you contradict someone, you say that what they have just said is wrong, or suggest that it is wrong by saying something different. [V n] She dared not contradict him... [V… …

    English dictionary

  • 11 contradict — verb 1 (T) to disagree with something by saying that it is wrong or not true, especially by saying that the opposite is true: contradict sb: Don t contradict your father! | flatly contradict: The article flatly contradicts what the lobbyists have …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 contradict */ — UK [ˌkɒntrəˈdɪkt] / US [ˌkɑntrəˈdɪkt] verb [transitive] Word forms contradict : present tense I/you/we/they contradict he/she/it contradicts present participle contradicting past tense contradicted past participle contradicted 1) to say that the… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 contradict — verb ADVERB ▪ blatantly (esp. AmE), clearly, completely, directly, flatly, totally (esp. AmE) ▪ John s account of the event directly contradicts Stephen s. VERB + CONTRADICT …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 14 contradict — con|tra|dict [ˌkɔntrəˈdıkt US ˌka:n ] v [Date: 1500 1600; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of contradicere, from contra ( CONTRA ) + dicere to say ] 1.) [I and T] to disagree with something, especially by saying that the opposite is true ▪… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 contradict — transitive verb Etymology: Latin contradictus, past participle of contradicere, from contra + dicere to say, speak more at diction Date: 1582 1. to assert the contrary of ; take issue with < contradict a rumor > 2. to imply the …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16 contradict — con|tra|dict [ ,kantrə dıkt ] verb transitive * 1. ) to say that the opposite of what someone has said is true: He didn t dare contradict his parents. 2. ) if one statement, piece of evidence, story, etc. contradicts another, they disagree and… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 17 contradict — contradictable, adj. contradicter, contradictor, n. /kon treuh dikt /, v.t. 1. to assert the contrary or opposite of; deny directly and categorically. 2. to speak contrary to the assertions of: to contradict oneself. 3. (of an action or event) to …

    Universalium

  • 18 contradict — verb deny the truth of (a statement) by asserting the opposite. ↘assert the opposite of a statement made by (someone). Derivatives contradictor noun Origin C16: from L. contradict , contradicere speak against …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 19 contradict — verb 1) he contradicted the government s account of the affair Syn: deny, rebut, dispute, challenge, counter, controvert; formal gainsay Ant: confirm, agree with 2) nobody dared to contradict him Syn …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 20 contradict — verb 1) he contradicted the government s account Syn: deny, refute, rebut, dispute, challenge, counter 2) nobody dared contradict him Syn: argue with, go against, challenge, oppose …

    Synonyms and antonyms dictionary