Bring+reproach

  • 1 bring reproach upon — index discredit, disgrace, disparage, stain Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 reproach — reproachable, adj. reproachableness, n. reproachably, adv. reproacher, n. reproachingly, adv. /ri prohch /, v.t. 1. to find fault with (a person, group, etc.); blame; censure …

    Universalium

  • 3 reproach´a|bly — re|proach «rih PROHCH», noun, verb. –n. 1. blame or censure: »to bring reproach on one s family. His conduct at work is above reproach. 2. a cause of blame or disgrace: »A coward is a reproach to an army. SYNONYM(S): discredit. 3. an object of… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 4 reproach — /rəˈproʊtʃ / (say ruh prohch) verb (t) 1. to find fault with (a person, etc.); blame; censure. 2. Obsolete to be a cause of blame or discredit to. –noun 3. blame or censure conveyed by reproaching: a term of reproach. 4. an expression of… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 5 Reproach — Re*proach (r? pr?ch ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproached} ( pr?cht ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproaching}.] [F. reprocher, OF. reprochier, (assumed) LL. reproriare; L. pref. re again, against, back + prope near; hence, originally, to bring near to, throw …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 reproach — ► VERB 1) express one s disapproval of or disappointment with. 2) (reproach with) accuse of. ► NOUN ▪ an expression of disapproval or disappointment. ● above (or beyond) reproach Cf. ↑beyond reproach …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 reproach — [ri prōch′] vt. [LME reprochen < OFr reprochier < VL * repropiare < L re , back + prope, near] 1. to accuse of and blame for a fault so as to make feel ashamed; rebuke; reprove 2. Rare to bring shame and disgrace upon; be a cause of… …

    English World dictionary

  • 8 reproach — Synonyms and related words: accusal, accusation, accuse, accusing, admonish, admonishment, admonition, allegation, allege, allegement, anathematize, anathemize, animadvert on, arraign, arraignment, article, aspersion, attaint, badge of infamy,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 9 reproach — I. noun Etymology: Middle English reproche, from Anglo French, from reprocher to reproach, from Vulgar Latin *repropiare to bring close, show, from Latin re + prope near more at approach Date: 14th century 1. an expression of rebuke or… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 10 reproach — {{11}}reproach (n.) mid 14c., a rebuke, a reproach; also object of scorn or contempt; c.1400, as disgrace, state of disgrace, from O.Fr. reproche (12c.), from reprocher to blame, bring up against, said by some Fr. etymologists to be from V.L.… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 11 reproach — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. t. blame, rebuke, upbraid, censure; stigmatize. n. reproof, blame, disgrace, discredit, dishonor. See disapprobation, disrepute, accusation. II (Roget s IV) n. Syn. discredit, censure, rebuke; see… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 12 reproach — verb 1》 express to (someone) one s disapproval of or disappointment in their actions. 2》 (reproach someone with) accuse someone of. noun 1》 an expression of disapproval or disappointment. 2》 (Reproaches) (in the Roman Catholic Church) a set of… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 13 reproach — [15] The proach of reproach is the same as that of approach. Both go back ultimately to Latin prope ‘near’. From this was formed the Vulgar Latin verb *repropiāre ‘bring back near’, which, by the time it reached Old French as reprochier, had… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 14 reproach — [15] The proach of reproach is the same as that of approach. Both go back ultimately to Latin prope ‘near’. From this was formed the Vulgar Latin verb *repropiāre ‘bring back near’, which, by the time it reached Old French as reprochier, had… …

    Word origins

  • 15 bring charges — Synonyms and related words: accuse, allege, arraign, article, book, bring accusation, bring to book, charge, cite, complain, denounce, denunciate, fasten on, fasten upon, finger, hang something on, impeach, imply, impute, indict, inform against,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 16 reproach — 1. noun /rɪˈpɹəʊtʃ,rɪˈpɹoʊtʃ/ a) A mild rebuke, or an implied criticism. b) Disgrace or shame. 2. verb /rɪˈpɹəʊtʃ,rɪˈpɹoʊtʃ/ a) To …

    Wiktionary

  • 17 To bring to terms — Term Term, n. [F. terme, L. termen, inis, terminus, a boundary limit, end; akin to Gr. ?, ?. See {Thrum} a tuft, and cf. {Terminus}, {Determine}, {Exterminate}.] 1. That which limits the extent of anything; limit; extremity; bound; boundary.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 disgrace — I noun abasement, abjectness, abomination, attaint, bad character, bad name, bad report, bad reputation, bad repute, badge of infamy, baseness, blemish, blot, brand, cause of reproach, cause of shame, comedown, condition of infamy, contempt,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 19 discredit — I noun animadversion, aspersion, attaint, baseness, castigation, censure, condemnation, contumely, criticism, debasement, dedecus, degradation, denunciation, derogation, disapprobation, disapproval, disbelief, disesteem, disfavor, disgrace,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 20 re|proach´ing|ly — re|proach «rih PROHCH», noun, verb. –n. 1. blame or censure: »to bring reproach on one s family. His conduct at work is above reproach. 2. a cause of blame or disgrace: »A coward is a reproach to an army. SYNONYM(S): discredit. 3. an object of… …

    Useful english dictionary