Act+of+deciding+judicially

  • 1 Maintenance of Religious Harmony Act — Old Parliament House, photographed in January 2006 An Act to provide for the maintenance of religious harmony and for establishing a Presidential Council for Religious Harmony and for matters conne …

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  • 2 Architects Act 1997 — Infobox UK Legislation short title=Architects Act 1997 parliament=Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland long title=An Act to consolidate the enactments relating to architects. statute book chapter=1997 Chapter 22… …

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  • 3 adjudication — n. 1. Act of deciding judicially. See adjudicate. 2. Sentence, decision, determination, decree, award, arbitrament …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 4 Natural justice — A tondo of an allegory of justice (1508) by Raphael in the Stanza della Segnatura (Room of the Apostolic Signatura) of the Apostolic Palace, Vatican City …

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  • 5 procedural law — Law that prescribes the procedures and methods for enforcing rights and duties and for obtaining redress (e.g., in a suit). It is distinguished from substantive law (i.e., law that creates, defines, or regulates rights and duties). Procedural law …

    Universalium

  • 6 Common law — For other uses, see Common law (disambiguation). Common law (also known as case law or precedent) is law developed by judges through decisions of courts and similar tribunals rather than through legislative statutes or executive branch action. A… …

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  • 7 Judicial functions of the House of Lords — This article is part of the series: Courts of England and Wales Law of England and Wales …

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  • 8 Miranda warning — The Miranda warning (also referred to as Miranda rights) is a warning that is required to be given by police in the United States to criminal suspects in police custody (or in a custodial interrogation) before they are interrogated to inform them …

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  • 9 Hugo Black — Infobox Judge name = Hugo Black imagesize = caption = office = Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court termstart = August 19, 1937 termend = September 18, 1971 nominator = Franklin Delano Roosevelt appointer = predecessor = Willis… …

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  • 10 Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution — US Constitution article seriesThe Fourth Amendment (Amendment IV) to the United States Constitution is a part of the Bill of Rights. The Fourth Amendment guards against unreasonable searches and seizures, and was designed as a response to the… …

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  • 11 constitutional law — Introduction       the body of rules, doctrines, and practices that govern the operation of political communities. In modern times the most important political community has been the state. Modern constitutional law is the offspring of… …

    Universalium

  • 12 jurisdiction — ju·ris·dic·tion /ˌju̇r əs dik shən/ n [Latin jurisdictio, from juris, genitive of jus law + dictio act of saying, from dicere to say] 1: the power, right, or authority to interpret, apply, and declare the law (as by rendering a decision) to be… …

    Law dictionary

  • 13 Nethermere (St. Neots) Ltd. v. Gardiner — And Another [1984] ICR 612 is a British labour law case in the Court of Appeal in the field of home work and vulnerable workers. Many labour and employment rights, such as unfair dismissal [s.94 of the Employment Rights Act 1996] , in Britain… …

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  • 14 Nethermere (St Neots) Ltd v Gardiner — Court Court of Appeal Citation(s) [1984] ICR 612 Case history Prior action(s) …

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  • 15 Napoleonic Code — First page of the 1804 original edition. The Napoleonic Code or Code Napoléon (originally, the Code civil des français) is the French civil code, established under Napoléon I in 1804. The code forbade privileges based on birth, allowed freedom of …

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  • 16 Communications Workers of America v. Beck — Supreme Court of the United States Argued January 11, 1988 …

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  • 17 Judicial restraint — is a theory of judicial interpretation that encourages judges to limit the exercise of their own power. It asserts that judges should hesitate to strike down laws unless they are obviously unconstitutional.… …

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  • 18 law — law1 lawlike, adj. /law/, n. 1. the principles and regulations established in a community by some authority and applicable to its people, whether in the form of legislation or of custom and policies recognized and enforced by judicial decision. 2 …

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  • 19 Law — /law/, n. 1. Andrew Bonar /bon euhr/, 1858 1923, English statesman, born in Canada: prime minister 1922 23. 2. John, 1671 1729, Scottish financier. 3. William, 1686 1761, English clergyman and devotional writer. * * * I Discipline and profession… …

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  • 20 Kentucky — This article is about the Commonwealth of Kentucky. For other uses, see Kentucky (disambiguation). Commonwealth of Kentucky …

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