take+feloniously

  • 41take a stand — {v. phr.} To assert one s point. of view; declare one s position. * /It is time for American society to take a stand against crime./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 42take a turn for the better — {v. phr.} To start improving; start to get better. * /Aunt Hermione was very ill for a long time, but last week she suddenly took a turn for the better./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 43take a turn for the worse — See: FOR THE WORSE. Contrast: TAKE A TURN FOR THE BETTER …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 44take a whack at — See: TAKE A SHOT AT …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 45take back — {v.} To change or deny something offered, promised, or stated; admit to making a wrong statement. * /I take back my offer to buy the house now that I ve had a good look at it./ * /I want you to take back the unkind things you said about Kenneth./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 46take by the scruff — {v. phr.} 1. To assert authority over a person. * /Tim s mother took him by the scruff and told him to get cleaned up./ 2. To punish a person. * /The boss took us by the scruff when he found us chatting idly by the coffee machine./ 3. To assume… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 47take care — {v. phr.} To be careful; use wisdom or caution. * /Take care that you don t spill that coffee!/ * /We must take care to let nobody hear about this./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 48take care of — {v. phr.} 1. To attend to; supply the needs of. * /She stayed home to take care of the baby./ Syn.: KEEP AN EYE ON(2), LOOK AFTER. Compare: IN CHARGE(2). 2. {informal} To deal with; do what is needed with. * /I will take care of that letter./ *… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 49take charge — {v. phr.} To begin to lead or control; take control or responsibility; undertake the care or management (of persons or things). * /When Mrs. Jackson was in the hospital, her sister took charge of the Jackson children until Mrs. Jackson could care …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 50take cold — See: CATCH COLD …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 51take cover — {v. phr.} To seek shelter or protection. * /The rain began so suddenly that we had to take cover in a doorway./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 52take down — {v.} 1. To write or record (what is said). * /I will tell you how to get to the place; you had better take it down./ 2. To pull to pieces; take apart. * /It will be a big job to take that tree down./ * /In the evening the campers put up a tent,… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 53take down a notch — or[take down a peg] {v. phr.}, {informal} To make (someone) less proud or sure of himself. * /The team was feeling proud of its record, but last week the boys were taken down a peg by a bad defeat./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 54take effect — {v. phr.} 1. To have an unexpected or intended result; cause a change. * /It was nearly an hour before the sleeping pill took effect./ 2. To become lawfully right, or operative. * /The new tax law will not take effect until January./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 55take exception to — {v. phr.} To speak against; find fault with; be displeased or angered by; criticize. * /There was nothing in the speech that you could take exception to./ * /Did she take exception to my remarks about her cooking./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 56take five — {v. phr.} To take a five minute break during some work or theatrical rehearsal. * / All right, everyone, the director cried. Let s take five. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 57take for — {v.} To suppose to be; mistake for. * /Do you take me for a fool?/ * /At first sight you would take him for a football player, not a poet./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 58take for a ride — {v. phr.}, {slang} 1. To take out in a car intending to murder. * /The gang leader decided that the informer must be taken for a ride./ 2. To play a trick on; fool. * /The girls told Linda that a movie star was visiting the school, but she did… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 59take for granted — {v. phr.} 1. To suppose or understand to be true. * /Mr. Harper took for granted that the invitation included his wife./ * /A teacher cannot take it for granted that students always do their homework./ Compare: BEG THE QUESTION. 2. To accept or… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 60take French leave — {v. phr.} To leave secretly; abscond. * /The party was so boring that we decided to take French leave./ * /While the Smith family was in Europe, the house sitter packed up all the silver and took French leave./ See: SLIP AWAY …

    Dictionary of American idioms