snatch

  • 21snatch — I UK [snætʃ] / US verb [transitive] Word forms snatch : present tense I/you/we/they snatch he/she/it snatches present participle snatching past tense snatched past participle snatched * 1) to pull or take something away quickly Her brother… …

    English dictionary

  • 22snatch — /snætʃ / (say snach) verb (i) 1. (sometimes followed by at) to make a sudden effort to seize something, as with the hand. 2. Rowing to make a hurried, jerky movement at the beginning of a stroke. –verb (t) 3. to seize by a sudden or hasty grasp:… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 23snatch — 1. tv. to kidnap someone. (Underworld.) □ We’re gonna snatch the kid when the baby sitter comes out to see what happened. □ The mob snatched Mrs. Davis and held her for ransom. 2. n. a kidnapping. (Underworld.) □ The Bradley snatch had the… …

    Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • 24snatch — ban·der·snatch; snatch; snatch·able; snatch·er; snatch·i·ly; snatch·ing·ly; …

    English syllables

  • 25snatch — snatch1 [ snætʃ ] verb transitive * 1. ) to pull or take something away quickly: Katherine angrily snatched her hand out of his grasp. Her brother snatched the letter and tore it open. a ) to quickly steal something from someone: Someone snatched …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 26snatch — {{11}}snatch (n.) c.1300, a trap, snare, from SNATCH (Cf. snatch) (v.). Vulgar slang sense of vulva is recorded from 1903; from a much older sense of sexual intercourse quickly performed (1580s). {{12}}snatch (v.) early 13c., of uncertain origin; …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 27Snatch — Большой куш Snatch Жанр комедия, боевик Режиссёр Гай Ричи Продюсер Мэттью Вон …

    Википедия

  • 28snatch — I n. fragment to catch snatches (of conversation) II v. 1) (d; intr.) to snatch at (she snatched at the line that the sailors threw to her) 2) (D; tr.) to snatch from, out of (he snatched the purse from her hand) * * * [snætʃ] out of (he snatched …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 29snatch up — verb to grasp hastily or eagerly (Freq. 1) Before I could stop him the dog snatched the ham bone • Syn: ↑snatch, ↑snap • See Also: ↑snap up (for: ↑snap) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 30snatch — 1 verb (T) 1 to take something away from someone with a quick violent movement; grab 1 (1): The thief snatched her purse and ran. 2 to quickly take the opportunity to do something for an hour etc because you do not have much time: I managed to… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 31snatch —   Kā ili, kā ili ili; apu (as with the teeth), po i.    ♦ To snatch away ruthlessly, kā ili kū, lālau ino.    ♦ To snatch without being seen, as by a thief, elemio, palamimo.    ♦ To snatch souls by sorcery, po i uhane …

    English-Hawaiian dictionary

  • 32snatch — 1. verb /snætʃ/ a) To grasp quickly. He snatched up the phone. b) To grasp and remove quickly. He snatched the letter out of the secretarys hand. Syn: grab …

    Wiktionary

  • 33snatch — Synonyms and related words: abduce, abduct, abduction, abstract, and, annex, apprehension, appropriate, arrest, arrestation, badger, bag, bit, blackmail, bob, boost, borrow, butt, capture, carry away, carry off, catch, catching, chip, chunk,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 34snatch — v 1.Usu. snatch at grab at or for, make a grab at, grasp at or for, grope for, clutch at, catch at, claw at, reach for, pursue; grapple for, scramble for, wrestle for, fight over; handle, feel, pick at, play with. 2. grab, pluck, pull, whisk,… …

    A Note on the Style of the synonym finder

  • 35snatch — [snætʃ] verb [T] I 1) to quickly take something or someone away Her brother snatched the letter and tore it open.[/ex] 2) to take the opportunity to do something quickly They managed to snatch a few hours sleep.[/ex] 3) to manage to get something …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 36snatch — sunkiosios atletikos dvikovė statusas T sritis Kūno kultūra ir sportas apibrėžtis Varžybos, apimančios štangos rovimo ir stūmimo veiksmus. Rezultatas – iškelto abiem veiksmais svorio suma. Įtraukta į olimpinių žaidynių programą nuo 1976 m.… …

    Sporto terminų žodynas

  • 37snatch — v. & n. v.tr. 1 seize quickly, eagerly, or unexpectedly, esp. with outstretched hands. 2 steal (a wallet, handbag, etc.). 3 secure with difficulty (snatched an hour s rest). 4 (foll. by away, from) take away or from esp. suddenly (snatched away… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 38snatch — I. verb Etymology: Middle English snacchen to snap, seize; akin to Middle Dutch snacken to snap at Date: 13th century intransitive verb to attempt to seize something suddenly transitive verb to take or grasp abruptly or hastily < snatch up a pen&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 39snatch — snatchable, adj. snatcher, n. snatchingly, adv. /snach/, v.i. 1. to make a sudden effort to seize something, as with the hand; grab (usually fol. by at). v.t. 2. to seize by a sudden or hasty grasp: He snatched the old lady s purse and ran. 3. to …

    Universalium

  • 40snatch up — phr verb Snatch up is used with these nouns as the object: ↑receiver …

    Collocations dictionary