shortcoming

  • 81Deficiency — De*fi cien*cy, n.; pl. {Deficiencies}. [See {Deficient}.] The state of being deficient; inadequacy; want; failure; imperfection; shortcoming; defect. A deficiency of blood. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] [Marlborough] was so miserably ignorant, that… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 82Deficiency of a curve — Deficiency De*fi cien*cy, n.; pl. {Deficiencies}. [See {Deficient}.] The state of being deficient; inadequacy; want; failure; imperfection; shortcoming; defect. A deficiency of blood. Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster] [Marlborough] was so miserably… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 83contrite — adjective Etymology: Middle English contrit, from Anglo French, from Medieval Latin contritus, from Latin, past participle of conterere to grind, bruise, from com + terere to rub more at throw Date: 14th century feeling or showing sorrow and… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 84dereliction — noun Date: 1597 1. a. an intentional abandonment b. the state of being abandoned 2. a recession of water leaving permanently dry land 3. a. intentional or conscious neglect …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 85foible — noun Etymology: obsolete French (now faible), from obsolete foible weak, from Old French feble feeble Date: circa 1648 1. the part of a sword or foil blade between the middle and point 2. a minor flaw or shortcoming in character or behavior ;… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 86hysteresis — noun (plural hystereses) Etymology: New Latin, from Greek hysterēsis shortcoming, from hysterein to be late, fall short, from hysteros later more at out Date: 1881 a retardation of an effect when the forces acting upon a body are changed (as if… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 87recovering — adjective Date: 1977 being in the process of overcoming a disorder or shortcoming < a recovering alcoholic > < a still bookish recovering academic with a tendency to live in his head Jon Spayde > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 88take to task — phrasal to call to account for a shortcoming ; criticize …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 8912-step — adjective Date: 1983 of, relating to, characteristic of, or being a program that is designed especially to help an individual overcome an addiction, compulsion, serious shortcoming, or traumatic experience by adherence to 12 tenets emphasizing&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 90debit — I. transitive verb Date: 1682 to enter upon the debit side of an account ; charge with a debit II. noun Etymology: Latin debitum debt Date: 1746 1. a. a record of an indebtedness; specifically an entry on the left hand side of an account&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 91defect — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Latin defectus lack, from deficere to desert, fail, from de + facere to do more at do Date: 15th century 1. a. an imperfection that impairs worth or utility ; shortcoming < the grave defects in our foreign&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 92fault — I. noun Etymology: Middle English faute, falte, from Anglo French, from Vulgar Latin *fallita, from feminine of fallitus, past participle of Latin fallere to deceive, disappoint Date: 13th century 1. obsolete lack 2. a. weakness, failing;&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 93nit — I. noun Etymology: Middle English nite, from Old English hnitu; akin to Old High German hniz nit, Greek konid , konis Date: before 12th century 1. the egg of a louse or other parasitic insect; also the insect itself when young 2. a minor&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 94shame — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Old English scamu; akin to Old High German scama shame Date: before 12th century 1. a. a painful emotion caused by consciousness of guilt, shortcoming, or impropriety b. the susceptibility to such emotion < …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 95sin — I. noun Etymology: Middle English sinne, from Old English synn; akin to Old High German sunta sin and probably to Latin sont , sons guilty, est is more at is Date: before 12th century 1. a. an offense against religious or moral law b. an action&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 96vice — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French, from Latin vitium fault, vice Date: 14th century 1. a. moral depravity or corruption ; wickedness b. a moral fault or failing c. a habitual and usually trivial defect or shortcoming ; foible …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 97Climate — For other uses, see Climate (disambiguation). Worldwide Climate Classifications Climate encompasses the statistics of temperature …

    Wikipedia

  • 98Cruiser — For other uses, see Cruiser (disambiguation). USS&#160;Port Royal&#160;(CG 73), a Ticonderoga class guided missile cruiser, launched in 1992. A cruiser is a type of warship. The term has been in use for several hundreds of years, and has had&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 99David Bowie — Bowie during the Heathen Tour in 2002. Background information Birth name David Robert Jones Born …

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  • 100Equation of state — In physics and thermodynamics, an equation of state is a relation between state variables.cite book | author=Perrot, Pierre | title=A to Z of Thermodynamics | publisher=Oxford University Press | year=1998 | id=ISBN 0 19 856552 6] More&#8230; …

    Wikipedia