secular+affairs

  • 141Sokrates —    Church historian whose History of the Church, covering the years 305 439, provides a reliable continuation of Eusebios of Caesarea s (q.v.) ecclesiastical history. Sokrates includes some information on secular affairs, unlike Theodoret (q.v.) …

    Historical dictionary of Byzantium

  • 142Nicholas of Damascus — (b. c. 64 BC)    Syrian writer and historian. Nicholas was born in Damascus, and became the tutor to the children of Antony and Cleopatra. On their death he was taken on as secretary to HEROD THE GREAT. He became Herod’s daily companion, his best …

    Who’s Who in Jewish History after the period of the Old Testament

  • 143JUSTINIAN — (483 565)    late Roman/early BYZANTINE Emperor who sought to restore the unity of the Empire. He is remembered for his legal reforms resulting in the CODE of Justinian which became the basis for much European law. In particular he was the first… …

    Concise dictionary of Religion

  • 144anticlerical — adj. opposed to the influence of religious institutions in secular affairs …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 145Antoninus — (1389–1459)    Saint, Archbishop, Theologian and Economist.    Antoninus was a native of Florence, and he joined the Dominican Order at Cortona at the age of sixteen. There he was a contemporary of Fra angelico. He rose rapidly in the Church,… …

    Who’s Who in Christianity

  • 146churchwarden — /tʃɜtʃˈwɔdn/ (say cherch wawdn) noun 1. a lay officer in the Church of England who looks after the secular affairs of the church. 2. a clay tobacco pipe with a very long stem …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 147deacon —    A deacon is an officer of various Christian churches, of lower rank than a priest. It is often his function to deal with the secular affairs of the Church. The deacon in The House with the Green Shutters, by George Douglas, is addressed by his …

    A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • 148deacon — n. & v. n. 1 (in Episcopal churches) a minister of the third order, below bishop and priest. 2 (in Nonconformist churches) a lay officer attending to a congregation s secular affairs. 3 (in the early Church) an appointed minister of charity. v.tr …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 149ABOAB, ISAAC I — (end of the 14th century), rabbinic author and preacher; probably lived in Spain. His father seems to have been called Abraham and may have been the Abraham Aboab to whom judah b. asher of Toledo (d. 1349) addressed responsa (Zikhron Yehudah, 53a …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 150BENDER, ALFRED PHILIP — (1863–1937), South African minister. The son of a minister of the Dublin Hebrew Congregation in Ireland, he was the recognized leader of Cape Town Jewry for many years, both in religious and secular affairs. He was minister of the Cape Town… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 151MENAHEM MENDEL OF VITEBSK — (1730–1788), ḥasidic leader active in Belorussia, Lithuania, and Ereẓ Israel. He was a disciple of dov baer the Maggid of Mezhirech, and headed a congregation in Minsk during the lifetime of his teacher; in Zemir Ariẓim ve Ḥarvot Ẓurim (Warsaw,… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 152SILVER, DANIEL JEREMY — (1928–1989), U.S. Reform rabbi. Daniel Jeremy Silver was the son of abba hillel silver (1893–1963). Born in Cleveland, Ohio, he was educated at Harvard University, received his rabbinical ordination from Hebrew Union College, and a doctoral… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 153ZILKHA, NAʿIM — (1879–1929), Iraqi lawyer. Zilkha started to practice law in his native baghdad in 1904. In 1908 he became a member of the Beirut Court of Appeals, retaining his post for over ten years and rising to deputy president of the court. Returning to… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 154RELIGIOUS LIFE AND COMMUNITIES — Jews UNDER OTTOMAN RULE The Jews of the pre Zionist old yishuv, both sephardim (from the Orient) and ashkenazim (of European origin), dedicated their lives to the fulfillment of religious precepts: the study of the torah and the meticulous… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 155Italy — /it l ee/, n. a republic in S Europe, comprising a peninsula S of the Alps, and Sicily, Sardinia, Elba, and other smaller islands: a kingdom 1870 1946. 57,534,088; 116,294 sq. mi. (301,200 sq. km). Cap.: Rome. Italian, Italia. * * * Italy… …

    Universalium

  • 156religion — religionless, adj. /ri lij euhn/, n. 1. a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, esp. when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency or agencies, usually involving devotional and ritual observances, and… …

    Universalium

  • 157Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …

    Universalium

  • 158education — /ej oo kay sheuhn/, n. 1. the act or process of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life. 2. the act or process of… …

    Universalium

  • 159Germany — /jerr meuh nee/, n. a republic in central Europe: after World War II divided into four zones, British, French, U.S., and Soviet, and in 1949 into East Germany and West Germany; East and West Germany were reunited in 1990. 84,068,216; 137,852 sq.… …

    Universalium

  • 160India — /in dee euh/, n. 1. Hindi, Bharat. a republic in S Asia: a union comprising 25 states and 7 union territories; formerly a British colony; gained independence Aug. 15, 1947; became a republic within the Commonwealth of Nations Jan. 26, 1950.… …

    Universalium