secular+affairs

  • 121capitulary — /keuh pich euh ler ee/, adj., n., pl. capitularies. adj. 1. pertaining to a chapter, esp. to an ecclesiastical one. n. 2. a member of a chapter, esp. of an ecclesiastical one. 3. Often, capitularies. an ordinance or law of a Frankish sovereign.… …

    Universalium

  • 122churchwarden — /cherrch wawr dn/, n. 1. Anglican Ch. a lay officer who looks after the secular affairs of the church, and who, in England, is the legal representative of the parish. 2. Episc. Ch. a lay church officer who, with other members of the vestry, is in …

    Universalium

  • 123Clement V — (Bertrand de Got) 1264 1314, French ecclesiastic: pope 1305 14. * * * orig. Bertrand de Got born с 1260, Bordelais region, France died April 20, 1314, Roquemaure, Provence Pope (1305–14), the first to reside at Avignon, France. He became… …

    Universalium

  • 124episcopacy — /i pis keuh peuh see/, n., pl. episcopacies. 1. government of the church by bishops; church government in which there are three distinct orders of ministers, namely bishops, priests or presbyters, and deacons. 2. episcopate. [1640 50;… …

    Universalium

  • 125Maria Theresa — /meuh ree euh teuh ray seuh, zeuh/ 1717 80, archduchess of Austria; queen of Hungary and Bohemia 1740 80 (wife of Francis II; mother of Joseph II, Leopold II, Marie Antoinette). German, Maria Theresia /mah rddee ah te rdday zee ah/. * * * German… …

    Universalium

  • 126Otto III — A.D. 980 1002, king of Germany 983 1002; emperor of the Holy Roman Empire 996 1002 (son of Otto II). * * * born July 980 died Jan. 23, 1002, near Viterbo, Italy German king (983–1002) and emperor (996–1002). He was elected German king at age 3,… …

    Universalium

  • 127Nāsir al-Dīn Shah — or Nāser od Dīn Shah born (b. July 17, 1831, Tehrān, Iran died May 1, 1896, Tehrān Qājār dynasty shah of Iran (1848–96) who began his reign as a reformer but became increasingly conservative. Domestically, he curbed the power of the clergy in… …

    Universalium

  • 128Páez, José Antonio — ▪ Venezuelan general born June 13, 1790, Curpa, near Acarigua, New Granada [now in Venezuela] died May 6, 1873, New York, N.Y., U.S.  Venezuelan soldier and politician, a leader in the country s independence movement and its first president. In… …

    Universalium

  • 129Cantate Sunday — • A name given to the fourth Sunday after Easter Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Cantate Sunday     Cantate Sunday     † …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 130Sacrilege — • The violation or injurious treatment of a sacred object. In a less proper sense any transgression against the virtue of religion would be a sacrilege Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Sacrilege     Sacrilege …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 131churchwarden — noun a) A lay officer of the Church of England who handles the secular affairs of the parish. b) A similar functionary of the Episcopal church …

    Wiktionary

  • 132Valla, Lorenzo — (1407 1457)    Italian humanist, active mainly in Rome and Naples, often regarded as the ablest humanist scholar of the 15th century. He is remembered especially for his innovative approach to linguistic and textual criticism. He was critical of… …

    Historical Dictionary of Renaissance

  • 133Choir monk — In Roman Catholicism the term Choir Monk is used to distinguish monks who may become priests from the lay brothers who are occupied mainly with secular affairs. Categories: AsceticismRoman Catholic Church stubs …

    Wikipedia

  • 134Nonsabbatarianism — Yemenite Jew blowing the shofar (ram s horn trumpet) for Sabbath in the 1930s. Nonsabbatarianism is the affirmation of the religious liberty not to observe a weekly rest or worship day (Sabbath), usually in Christianity. While keepers of weekly… …

    Wikipedia

  • 135Otto III van Holland — Otto van Holland (died 27 March 1249) was a bishop of Utrecht from 1233 to 1249. Otto was the second son of William I, Count of Holland and his first wife Aleid van Gelre. He was chosen as bishop in 1233, but because of resistance from the canons …

    Wikipedia

  • 136Christianity —    In the early Middle Ages, Christianity was propa gated by missionaries from England. One of the first was Willibrord, who preached among the Frisians. His most famous comissionary was Bonifatius, born about 672 in Wessex and later archbishop… …

    Historical Dictionary of the Netherlands

  • 137Divine Comedy, The — (Commedia)    by Dante Alighieri (1307–1321)    Italian poet DANTE ALIGHIERI’s Divine Comedy is one of the seminal works of Western culture and the unrivaled greatest literary text of the European Middle Ages. The poem is epic in scope, telling… …

    Encyclopedia of medieval literature

  • 138PRUDENTIUS, MARCUS AURELIUS CLEMENS —    Christian poet of the 4th century, born in Spain; after spending the greater part of his life in secular affairs, gave himself up to religious meditation, and wrote hymns, lyrics, and polemics in verse …

    The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • 139YOUNG, BRIGHAM —    Mormon polygamist chief, born at Whittingham, Vermont, U.S., son of a small farmer; had no schooling, wrought as carpenter, fell in with Joe Smith s brother, and embraced Mormonism in 1832; became one of the apostles of the Church and a… …

    The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • 140Vestry —    The name given to the room attached to or within the church building, used for vesting in, or in which the vestments are kept. From the old custom of parish meetings be held in it, such meetings were called the Vestry; a name that has since… …

    American Church Dictionary and Cyclopedia