scorn

  • 21scorn — I UK [skɔː(r)n] / US [skɔrn] noun [uncountable] a feeling that someone or something is not good enough to deserve your approval or respect scorn for: He had nothing but scorn for the opinions of others. • heap/pour scorn on someone/something to… …

    English dictionary

  • 22scorn — 1 noun (U) the feeling that someone or something is stupid, old fashioned, or not as good as other people or things; contempt (+ for): They had nothing but scorn for their working class parents. | pour scorn on: Davis poured scorn on the proposal …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 23scorn — scorner, n. scorningly, adv. /skawrn/, n. 1. open or unqualified contempt; disdain: His face and attitude showed the scorn he felt. 2. an object of derision or contempt. 3. a derisive or contemptuous action or speech. 4. laugh to scorn, to… …

    Universalium

  • 24scorn — 01. She [scorned] my offer to help her, saying she could do better job without me. 02. He is very [scornful] of any suggestion that someone else in the firm might be a better salesman. 03. Management s claim that they needed to cut workers… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 25scorn — 1. noun he was unable to hide the scorn in his voice Syn: contempt, derision, contemptuousness, disdain, derisiveness, mockery, sneering Ant: admiration, respect 2. verb 1) critics scorned the painting Syn …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 26scorn — [[t]skɔrn[/t]] n. 1) open or unqualified contempt; disdain 2) an object of derision or contempt 3) a derisive or contemptuous action or speech 4) to treat or regard with contempt or disdain 5) to reject or refuse with contempt or disdain: She… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 27scorn — /skɔn / (say skawn) noun 1. open or unqualified contempt; disdain. 2. mockery or derision. 3. an object of derision or contempt. 4. Obsolete a derisive or contemptuous action or speech. –verb (t) 5. to treat or regard with scorn. 6. to reject or… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 28scorn — n. & v. n. 1 disdain, contempt, derision. 2 an object of contempt etc. (the scorn of all onlookers). v.tr. 1 hold in contempt or disdain. 2 (often foll. by to + infin.) abstain from or refuse to do as unworthy (scorns lying; scorns to lie).… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 29scorn — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French escharne, escar, of Germanic origin; akin to Old High German scern jest Date: 13th century 1. open dislike and disrespect or derision often mixed with indignation 2. an expression of contempt… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 30scorn — Synonyms and related words: abhor, airs, arrogance, be above, be contemptuous of, care nothing for, clannishness, cliquishness, contemn, contempt, contemptuousness, contumely, deprecation, deride, derision, despisal, despise, despite, disavow,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 31scorn — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. contempt, disdain, superciliousness; derision, ridicule. v. t. despise, disdain, contemn, spurn, neglect. See rejection, disrespect. Ant., respect. II (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To treat with scorn] Syn.… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 32scorn — [12] Scorn reached English via Old French, but it is ultimately of Germanic origin. Its immediate source was Old French escharnir, a descendant of Vulgar Latin *escarnīre. This had been borrowed from a prehistoric Germanic *skarnjan ‘mock, deride …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 33scorn — noun 1》 contempt or disdain expressed openly. 2》 archaic a statement or gesture showing contempt. verb 1》 express scorn for. 2》 reject in a contemptuous way. Derivatives scorner noun scornful adjective scornfully adverb scornfulness …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 34scorn — 1. noun the scorn in his voice Syn: contempt, derision, disdain, mockery, sneering Ant: admiration, respect 2. verb 1) critics scorned the talks Syn: deride, treat with contempt …

    Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • 35scorn — [skɔːn] noun [U] I a feeling that someone or something is not good enough to deserve your approval or respect II verb [T] scorn [skɔːn] to treat someone or something as if they do not deserve your approval or respect …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 36scorn — [12] Scorn reached English via Old French, but it is ultimately of Germanic origin. Its immediate source was Old French escharnir, a descendant of Vulgar Latin *escarnīre. This had been borrowed from a prehistoric Germanic *skarnjan ‘mock, deride …

    Word origins

  • 37scorn — 1. verb /skɔːn/ a) To feel or display contempt or disdain for something or somebody; to despise. He scorned her romantic advances. b) To scoff, express contempt 2 …

    Wiktionary

  • 38scorn — v. a. Ps. ii. 4. 80 B. OHG. skernon. Fr. escharnir. SS. scarn, scare. Ital. scorno …

    Oldest English Words

  • 39scorn — skÉ”rn /skɔːn n. derision, ridicule, mockery; target of mockery, object of ridicule v. ridicule, mock, deride; reject with contempt; treat with derision, treat with contempt …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 40scorn — corns …

    Anagrams dictionary