reproach

  • 121Twitting — Twit Twit, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Twitted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Twitting}.] [OE. atwiten, AS. [ae]tw[=i]tan to reproach, blame; [ae]t at + w[=i]tan to reproach, blame; originally, to observe, see, hence, to observe what is wrong (cf. the meanings of E …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 122Upbraid — Up*braid ([u^]p*br[=a]d ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Upbraided}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Upbraiding}.] [OE. upbreiden; AS. upp up + bregdan to draw, twist, weave, or the kindred Icel. breg[eth]a to draw, brandish, braid, deviate from, change, break off,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 123Upbraided — Upbraid Up*braid ([u^]p*br[=a]d ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Upbraided}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Upbraiding}.] [OE. upbreiden; AS. upp up + bregdan to draw, twist, weave, or the kindred Icel. breg[eth]a to draw, brandish, braid, deviate from, change, break… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 124Upbraiding — Upbraid Up*braid ([u^]p*br[=a]d ), v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Upbraided}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Upbraiding}.] [OE. upbreiden; AS. upp up + bregdan to draw, twist, weave, or the kindred Icel. breg[eth]a to draw, brandish, braid, deviate from, change, break… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 125opprobrium — noun Etymology: Latin, from opprobrare to reproach, from ob in the way of + probrum reproach; akin to Latin pro forward and to Latin ferre to carry, bring more at ob , for, bear Date: 1656 1. something that brings disgrace 2. a. public disgrace… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 126twit — I. noun Date: 1528 1. an act of twitting ; taunt 2. a silly annoying person ; fool II. transitive verb (twitted; twitting) Etymology: Middle English atwiten to reproach, from Old Engli …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 127First Epistle to Timothy — The First Epistle to Timothy is one of three letters in New Testament of the Bible often grouped together as the Pastoral Epistles. (The others are Second Timothy and Titus.) The letter, traditionally attributed to Saint Paul, consists mainly of… …

    Wikipedia

  • 128opprobrium — /euh proh bree euhm/, n. 1. the disgrace or the reproach incurred by conduct considered outrageously shameful; infamy. 2. a cause or object of such disgrace or reproach. [1650 60; < L: reproach, equiv. to op OP + probr(um) infamy, disgrace + ium&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 129reproachful — reproachfully, adv. reproachfulness, n. /ri prohch feuhl/, adj. 1. full of or expressing reproach or censure: a reproachful look. 2. Obs. deserving reproach; shameful. [1540 50; REPROACH + FUL] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 130upbraid — upbraider, n. /up brayd /, v.t. 1. to find fault with or reproach severely; censure: The military tribunal upbraided the soldier for his cowardice. 2. (of things) to bring reproach on; serve as a reproach to. v.i. 3. Archaic. to utter reproaches …

    Universalium

  • 131Circumcision — • The Hebrew word, like the Greek (peritome), and the Latin (circumcisio), signifies a cutting and, specifically, the removal of the prepuce, or foreskin, from the penis Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Circumcision     Circu …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 132Lights — • Article concerned with the general aspects and in particular with the charge so often levelled against Catholicism of adopting wholesale the ceremonial practices of the pagan world Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Lights     Ligh …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 133Louis Bourdaloue —     Louis Bourdaloue     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Louis Bourdaloue     Born at Bourges, 20 August, 1632; died at Paris, 13 May, 1704. He is often described as the king of preachers and the preacher of kings. He entered the Society of Jesus at&#8230; …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 134abuse — 1 /ə byüz/ vt abused, abus·ing 1: to put to a use other than the one intended: as a: to put to a bad or unfair use abusing the powers of office b: to put to improper or excessive use abuse narcotics …

    Law dictionary

  • 135contempt — con·tempt /kən tempt/ n 1: willful disobedience or open disrespect of the orders, authority, or dignity of a court or judge acting in a judicial capacity by disruptive language or conduct or by failure to obey the court s orders; also: the&#8230; …

    Law dictionary

  • 136denounce — I (condemn) verb anathematize, animadvert, asperse, assail, assail with censure, assault, attack, be censorious, belittle, berate, besmear, besmirch, blackball, blacken, blacklist, brand, bring into discredit, bring to account, call to account,&#8230; …

    Law dictionary

  • 137obloquy — I noun abasement, abuse, abusive language, accusation, animadversion, aspersion, berating, blame, castigation, censure, chastisement, chiding, contempt, criticism, debasement, defamation, degradation, denunciation, derision, derogation, diatribe …

    Law dictionary

  • 138disparagement — dis·par·age·ment /di spar ij mənt/ n 1: the publication of false and injurious statements that are derogatory of another s property, business, or product – called also business disparagement, commercial disparagement, disparagement of property,&#8230; …

    Law dictionary

  • 139complain — com·plain vi: to make a complaint Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. complain I ( …

    Law dictionary

  • 140rebuke — I verb accuse, admonish, animadvert on, berate, blame, bring to book, call down, call to account, call to task, castigate, censure, charge, chastise, chide, correct, criminate, criticize, disapprove, exprobrate, find fault with, judge, lecture,&#8230; …

    Law dictionary