range

  • 21rangé — Rangé, [rang]ée. part. Il a les significations de son verbe. On appelle Bataille rangée, Un combat entre deux armées rangées en ordre de bataille …

    Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • 22Range — The high and low prices, or high and low bids and offers recorded during a specified time. The New York Times Financial Glossary * * * ▪ I. range range 1 [reɪndʒ] noun [countable] 1. the limits within which amounts, quantities etc can vary: • We… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 23range — ( price) The price span during a given trading session, week, month, year, etc. Chicago Board of Trade glossary The difference between the highest and lowest prices recorded during a specified time period, usually one trading session, for a given …

    Financial and business terms

  • 24range — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun 1 different things within the same category ADJECTIVE ▪ broad, enormous, extensive, great, huge, large, vast, wide ▪ …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 25range — range1 W1S1 [reındʒ] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(variety of things/people)¦ 2¦(limits)¦ 3¦(products)¦ 4¦(distance)¦ 5¦(music)¦ 6¦(mountains/hills)¦ 7¦(place for shooting)¦ 8¦(ability)¦ 9¦(land)¦ 10¦(cooking)¦ …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 26range — 1 /reIndZ/ noun 1 GROUP (singular) a number of things which are all different but of the same general type (+ of): an interesting range of books and videos | The drug is effective against a range of bacteria. | We teach the full range of ballroom …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 27range — /raynj/, n., adj., v., ranged, ranging. n. 1. the extent to which or the limits between which variation is possible: the range of steel prices; a wide range of styles. 2. the extent or scope of the operation or action of something: within range… …

    Universalium

  • 28range — I n. series of connecting mountains 1) a mountain range distance that a gun fires, can fire 2) close; long; point blank range 3) artillery; rifle range 4) at a certain range (at close range) 5) in, within range 6) out of range place where… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 29range — [[t]re͟ɪnʤ[/t]] ♦♦ ranges, ranging, ranged 1) N COUNT: usu with supp, oft N of n A range of things is a number of different things of the same general kind. A wide range of colours and patterns are available... The two men discussed a range of… …

    English dictionary

  • 30range — range1 [ reındʒ ] noun *** ▸ 1 things of same type ▸ 2 limits for dealing with ▸ 3 longest distance for something ▸ 4 open area of land ▸ 5 area of farm for animals ▸ 6 for cooking ▸ 7 group of mountains 1. ) count a number of different things… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 31range — I UK [reɪndʒ] / US noun Word forms range : singular range plural ranges *** 1) [countable] a number of different things that are of the same general type range of: The speaker will deal with a broad a range of issues affecting professional women …

    English dictionary

  • 32Range — Contents 1 Mathematics, science, and technology 1.1 In mathematics 1 …

    Wikipedia

  • 33range — 01. There is a wide [range] of abilities in our tennis club, from absolute beginners to those who have played professionally. 02. We have discussed a good [range] of controversial topics in this class. 03. We chose the color for our living room… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 34range — ar·range; ar·range·ment; cit·range; cit·range·quat; de·range; de·range·able; de·range·ment; mac·ro·spo·range; mi·cro·spo·range; om·ni·range; range; range·ley; spo·range; sub·range; …

    English syllables

  • 35range — /reɪndʒ / (say raynj) noun 1. the extent to which, or the limits between which, variation is possible: the range of prices for a commodity. 2. the extent or scope of the operation or efficacy of something: within range of vision. 3. the distance… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 36range — 1. noun 1) his range of vision Syn: span, scope, compass, sweep, extent, area, field, orbit, ambit, horizon, latitude; limits, bounds, confines, parameters 2) a range of mountains …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 37range — I. noun Usage: often attributive Etymology: Middle English, row of persons, from Anglo French range, renge, from renger to range Date: 14th century 1. a. (1) a series of things in a line ; row (2) a series of mountains (3) …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 38range — [[t]reɪndʒ[/t]] n. adj. v. ranged, rang•ing 1) the extent to which or the limits between which variation is possible: the range of steel prices[/ex] 2) the extent or scope of something: one s range of vision[/ex] 3) the distance to which a… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 39range — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. row, series, chain; scope, extent; habitat; limit, span, latitude; compass, register; Distance; stove[top], cooktop. See continuity, space, business, freedom, direction, degree. II (Roget s IV) n. 1.… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 40range*/*/*/ — [reɪndʒ] noun I 1) [C] a number of different things that are of the same general type We discussed a range of issues affecting professional women.[/ex] We stock a wide range of office furniture.[/ex] 2) [C] all the numbers, ages, measurements etc …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English