presumptuous

  • 141To keep under — Keep Keep (k[=e]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Kept} (k[e^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Keeping}.] [OE. k[=e]pen, AS. c[=e]pan to keep, regard, desire, await, take, betake; cf. AS. copenere lover, OE. copnien to desire.] 1. To care; to desire. [Obs.] [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 142To keep up — Keep Keep (k[=e]p), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Kept} (k[e^]pt); p. pr. & vb. n. {Keeping}.] [OE. k[=e]pen, AS. c[=e]pan to keep, regard, desire, await, take, betake; cf. AS. copenere lover, OE. copnien to desire.] 1. To care; to desire. [Obs.] [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 143To sell short — Short Short, adv. In a short manner; briefly; limitedly; abruptly; quickly; as, to stop short in one s course; to turn short. [1913 Webster] He was taken up very short, and adjudged corrigible for such presumptuous language. Howell. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 144To take into one's confidence — Confidence Con fi*dence, n. [L. confidentia firm trust in, self confidence: cf. F. confidence.] 1. The act of confiding, trusting, or putting faith in; trust; reliance; belief; formerly followed by of, now commonly by in. [1913 Webster] Society… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 145Whippersnapper — Whip per*snap per, n. A diminutive, insignificant, or presumptuous person. [Colloq.] Little whippersnappers like you. T. Hughes. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 146arrogance — noun Date: 14th century an attitude of superiority manifested in an overbearing manner or in presumptuous claims or assumptions …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 147assuming — adjective Date: 1692 pretentious, presumptuous …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 148brassbound — adjective Date: 1767 1. having trim made of brass or a metal resembling brass 2. a. (1) tradition bound and opinionated (2) making no concessions ; inflexible b. brazen, presumptuous …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 149overweening — adjective Etymology: Middle English overwening, present participle of overwenen to be arrogant, from over + wenen to ween Date: 14th century 1. arrogant, presumptuous 2. immoderate, exaggerated • overweeningly adverb …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 150presuming — adjective Date: 15th century presumptuous • presumingly adverb …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 151uppity — adjective Etymology: probably from up + ity (as in persnickity, variant of persnickety) Date: 1880 putting on or marked by airs of superiority ; arrogant, presumptuous < uppity technicians > < a small uppity country > • uppitiness also uppityness …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 152whippersnapper — noun Etymology: alteration of snippersnapper Date: 1700 a diminutive, insignificant, or presumptuous person …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 153bold — I. adjective Etymology: Middle English, from Old English beald; akin to Old High German bald bold Date: before 12th century 1. a. fearless before danger ; intrepid b. showing or requiring a fearless daring spirit < a bold plan > 2. impu …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 154copy — I. noun (plural copies) Etymology: Middle English copie, from Anglo French, from Medieval Latin copia, from Latin, abundance more at copious Date: 14th century 1. an imitation, transcript, or reproduction of an original work (as a letter, a&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 155familiar — I. noun Date: 13th century 1. a member of the household of a high official 2. one that is familiar; especially an intimate associate ; companion 3. a spirit often embodied in an animal and held to attend and serve or guard a person 4. a. one who&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 156nerve — I. noun Etymology: Latin nervus sinew, nerve; akin to Greek neuron sinew, nerve, nēn to spin more at needle Date: 14th century 1. sinew, tendon < strain every nerve > 2. any of the filamentous bands of nervous tissue that connect parts of the&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 157pry — I. intransitive verb (pried; prying) Etymology: Middle English prien Date: 14th century to look closely or inquisitively; also to make a nosy or presumptuous inquiry II. transitive verb (pried; prying) Etymology: probably back formation from 5 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 158snip — I. noun Etymology: from or akin to Dutch & Low German snip; akin to Middle High German snipfen to snap the fingers Date: 1558 1. a. a small piece that is snipped off; also fragment, bit b. a cut or notch made by snipping c. an act or sound of&#8230; …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 159sure — I. adjective (surer; surest) Etymology: Middle English seur, sure, from Anglo French seur, from Latin securus secure Date: 13th century 1. obsolete safe from danger or harm 2. firmly established ; steadfast < a sure …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 160presumptuously — adverb see presumptuous …

    New Collegiate Dictionary