one's+own

  • 21 dose of one's own medicine — or[taste of one s own medicine] {n. phr.} Being treated in the same way you treat others; something bad done to you as you have done bad to other people. * /Jim was always playing tricks on other boys. Finally they decided to give him a dose of… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 22 hold one's own — verb 1. be sufficiently competent in a certain situation He can hold his own in graduate school • Verb Frames: Somebody s 2. maintain one s position and be in control of a situation • Hypernyms: ↑control, ↑command …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 23 hoist with one's own petard — phrasal or hoist by one s own petard : blown up by one s own bomb; usually : victimized or hurt by one s own scheme * * * hoist with one s own petard Caught in one s own trap • • • Main Entry: ↑hoist hoist with one s own petard …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 24 in one's own right — adverb by reason of one s own ability or ownership etc. she s a rich woman in her own right rather than by inheritance an excellent novel in its own right • Syn: ↑in his own right, ↑in her own right, ↑in its own right * * * phrasal : by title… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 25 of one's own accord — or[of one s own free will] {adv. phr.} Without suggestion or help from anyone else; without being told; voluntarily. * /On her mother s birthday, Betsy did the dishes of her own accord./ * /But Johnny hates baths. I can t believe he would take… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 26 of one's own accord — or[of one s own free will] {adv. phr.} Without suggestion or help from anyone else; without being told; voluntarily. * /On her mother s birthday, Betsy did the dishes of her own accord./ * /But Johnny hates baths. I can t believe he would take… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 27 To take one's own course — Take Take, v. t. [imp. {Took} (t[oo^]k); p. p. {Taken} (t[=a]k n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Taking}.] [Icel. taka; akin to Sw. taga, Dan. tage, Goth. t[=e]kan to touch; of uncertain origin.] 1. In an active sense; To lay hold of; to seize with the hands …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 28 be on one's own — • to be on one s own • to work on one s own • to live on one s own • to do smth on one s own (from Idioms in Speech) to be independent, not directed or controlled by others, or simply just to be by oneself He thought it was wrong of him to go off …

    Idioms and examples

  • 29 do smth on one's own — • to be on one s own • to work on one s own • to live on one s own • to do smth on one s own (from Idioms in Speech) to be independent, not directed or controlled by others, or simply just to be by oneself He thought it was wrong of him to go off …

    Idioms and examples

  • 30 live on one's own — • to be on one s own • to work on one s own • to live on one s own • to do smth on one s own (from Idioms in Speech) to be independent, not directed or controlled by others, or simply just to be by oneself He thought it was wrong of him to go off …

    Idioms and examples

  • 31 work on one's own — • to be on one s own • to work on one s own • to live on one s own • to do smth on one s own (from Idioms in Speech) to be independent, not directed or controlled by others, or simply just to be by oneself He thought it was wrong of him to go off …

    Idioms and examples

  • 32 hoe one's own row — {v. phr.} To make your way in life by your own efforts; get along without help. * /David s father died when he was little, and he has always had to hoe his own row./ Syn.: PADDLE ONE S OWN CANOE, STAND ON ONE S OWN FEET …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 33 in a world of one's own — or[in a world by oneself] 1. In the place where you belong; in your own personal surroundings; apart from other people. * /They are in a little world of their own in their house on the mountain./ 2a. In deep thought or concentration. * /Mary is… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 34 hoe one's own row — {v. phr.} To make your way in life by your own efforts; get along without help. * /David s father died when he was little, and he has always had to hoe his own row./ Syn.: PADDLE ONE S OWN CANOE, STAND ON ONE S OWN FEET …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 35 in a world of one's own — or[in a world by oneself] 1. In the place where you belong; in your own personal surroundings; apart from other people. * /They are in a little world of their own in their house on the mountain./ 2a. In deep thought or concentration. * /Mary is… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 36 Out of one's own head — Head Head (h[e^]d), n. [OE. hed, heved, heaved, AS. he[ a]fod; akin to D. hoofd, OHG. houbit, G. haupt, Icel. h[ o]fu[eth], Sw. hufvud, Dan. hoved, Goth. haubi[thorn]. The word does not correspond regularly to L. caput head (cf. E. {Chief},… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 37 off one's own bat — phrasal : through one s own efforts : on one s own account able to win the war off its own bat George Orwell * * * off one s own bat 1. By one s own efforts 2. On one s own initiative • • • Main Entry: ↑bat …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 38 blow one's own horn — or[toot one s own horn] {v. phr.}, {slang} To praise yourself; call attention to your own skill, intelligence, or successes; boast. * /People get tired of a man who is always blowing his own horn./ * /A person who does things well does not have… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 39 of one's own free will — See: OF ONE S OWN ACCORD …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 40 blow one's own horn — or[toot one s own horn] {v. phr.}, {slang} To praise yourself; call attention to your own skill, intelligence, or successes; boast. * /People get tired of a man who is always blowing his own horn./ * /A person who does things well does not have… …

    Dictionary of American idioms